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NPS ARCHIVE 
1997^ QQ? 



BROWN, M. 

NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL 
Monterey, California 




THESIS 



Thesis 
B8186 



JOEVT DEPLOYABLE INTELLIGENCE SUPPORT 

SYSTEM (JDISS) COMMUNICATIONS AND 

IMAGERY APPLICATION GUIDE FOR NEW 

USERS 

by 

Marlon F. Brown 



June 1997 



Principal Advisor: 



Gary R. Porter 



Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. 



DUDLEY KNOX LIBRARY 

NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL 

MONTEREY CA 93943-uiJi 



REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 



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AGENCY USE ONLY (Leave blank) 



REPORT DATE 

June 1997 



3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED 

Master's Thesis 



4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 

JOINT DEPLOYABLE INTELLIGENCE SUPPORT SYSTEM 
(JDISS) COMMUNICATIONS AND IMAGERY APPLICATION 
GUIDE FOR NEW USERS 



6. AUTHOR(S) 



Marlon F. Brown 



5. FUNDING NUMBERS 



7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 



Naval Postgraduate School 
Monterey CA 93943-5000 



8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION 
REPORT NUMBER: 



9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 



10. SPONSORING/MONITORING 
AGENCY REPORT NUMBER: 



11. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 

The views expressed in this thesis are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy or 
position of the Department of Defense or the US Government. 



12a. DISTRIBUTION/AVAILABILITY STATEMENT 

Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. 



12b. DISTRIBUTION CODE 



1 3. ABSTRACT (maximum 200 words) 

The purpose of this thesis is to provide a Joint Deployable Intelligence Support System (JDISS) 
Communication and Imagery Application Guide for New Users. These two applications, together, are the 
core of the JDISS program. Both applications were examined to identify' functions and processes that are 
difficult to understand as well as functions and processes that lack sufficient instructions for new users. The 
supporting JDISS Desktop and Utilities applications were added to provide the knowledge base required for 
the new user to use the Application Guide as a stand-alone document. Other JDISS applications, such as 
Office Tools, E-mail, Intelink, etc., are not included due, in part, to a common thread with other programs 
that the new user should already be familiar with, but mostly due to the adequate help instructions readily 
available within the JDISS main desktop help function. 

The JDISS program was developed to ensure that each of the U.S. Services and Agencies had an 
integrated intelligence system, and one that would provide a common data standard permitting 
interoperability both mtra-service and inter-service. The Jomt Staff Director of Intelligence (J2), has 
highlighted JDISS in joint doctrine as the principal intelligence component for interoperability (JBOC, 
1996). Therefore, this detailed, step-by-step JDISS Communication and Imagery Application Guide for New 
Users was developed and designed to help future JDISS users worldwide 



14. SUBJECT TERMS 

JDISS, Joint Deployable Intelligence Support System, Communications, 
Images, Imagery, Application Guide for New Users 



I 



17. SECURITY CLASSI- 
FICATION OF REPORT 

Unclassified 



18. SECURITY CLASSI- 
FICATION OF THIS PAGE 

Unclassified 



19. SECURIPr' CLASSI- 
FICATION OF ABSTRACT 

Unclassified 



15. NUMBER OF PAGES: 

161 



16. PRICE CODE 



20. LIMITATION OF 
ABSTRACT 

UL 



NSN 7540-01-280-5500 



Standard Form 298 (Rev. 2-89) 

Prescnbed bv ANSI Sid. 239-18 



Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. 

JOINT DEPLOY ABLE INTELLIGENCE SUPPORT SYSTEM (JDISS) 
COMMUNICATIONS AND IMAGERY APPLICATION GUIDE FOR NEW 

USERS 

Marlon F. Brown 

Major, United States Marine Corps 

B.S., Southern Illinois University, 1986 



Submitted in partial fulfillment of the 
requirements for the degree of 



MASTER OF SCIENCE IN SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY 
(COMMAND, CONTROL AND COMMUNICATIONS) 

from the 



NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL 
June 19^7^ 



1 I ^-^ ' \ \ 



K OC 



Pla^VN/ 




DUDLEY KNOX LIBRARY 

NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL 

MONTEREY CA 9394;>Si01 



ABSTRACT 



The purpose of this thesis is to provide a Joint Deployable IntelHgence Support 
System (JDISS) Communication and Imagery Application Guide for New Users. These 
two applications, together, are the core of the JDISS program. Both applications were 
examined to identify fiinctions and processes that are difficult to understand as well as 
functions and processes that lack sufficient instructions for new users. The supporting 
JDISS Desktop and Utilities applications were added to provide the knowledge base 
required for the new user to use the Application Guide as a stand-alone document. Other 
JDISS applications, such as Office Tools, Email, Intelink, etc., are not included due, in 
part, to a common thread with other programs that the new user should already be 
familiar with, but mostly due to the adequate help instructions readily available within the 
JDISS main desktop help function. 

The JDISS program was developed to ensure that each of the U.S. Services and 
Agencies had an integrated intelligence system, and one that would provide a common 
data standard permitting interoperability both intra-service and inter-service. The Joint 
Staff, Director of Intelligence (J2), has highlighted JDISS in joint doctrine as the 
principal intelligence component for interoperability (JBOC, 1996). Therefore, this 
detailed, step-by-step JDISS Communication and Imagery Application Guide for New 
Users was developed and designed to help future JDISS users worldwide. 



VI 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



I. INTRODUCTION .1 

n. JDISS PROSPERITY 5 

A. JDISS YESTERDAY 6 

B. JDISS TODAY 7 

1. JDISS Applications 8 

a. Communications 9 

b. Email (Electronic Mail) 11 

c. Office Tools 11 

d. Images 12 

e. Utilities 13 

2. JDISS Automatic Dissemination 14 

a. Pull Architecture 14 

b. "Smart" Push 15 

c. Advantages 16 

3. JDISS Client-Server Environment (CSE) 16 

a. Stand-alone Workstations 17 

b. Client-Server Workstations 17 

c. JDISS Growth 18 

C. JDISS TOMORROW 18 

III. SUMMARY 21 

APPEN DIX A: JOINT DEPLOYABLE E^TELLIGENCE SUPPORT SYSTEM 
(JDISS) COMMUNICATIONS AND IMAGERY APPLICATION GUIDE FOR 
NEW USERS 23 

APPENDIX B: JOINT DEPLOYABLE INTELLIGENCE SUPPORT SYSTEM (JDISS) 
WORKSTATIONS REQUIREMENTS AND PERIPHERALS 25 

LIST OF REFERENCES 27 

INITIAL DISTRIBUTION LIST 29 



VI 1 



Vlll 



LIST OF ACRONYMS 



ACOM 
ADP 
AIM 
AMHS 

ANSI 

API 

AS AS 

ASCII 

ATM 

AT&T 

AUTODIN 

BERT 
BIND 
BSN 

C2 

C4I 

CAD 

CAE 

CAM 

CATIS 

CD 

CDROM 

CEP 

CI 

CINC 

CINCLANTFLT 

CIO 

CJCS 

CJTF 

CO 

COE 

COCOM 

COMINT 

COMSAT 

CONOPS 

CONUS 

COTS 

CPU 

CS 

CSE 



Atlantic Command 
Automated Data Processing 
Automated Information Management 
Automated Message Handling System 
American National Standards Institute 
Application Programming Interface 
All-Source Analysis System 
Amercian Standard Code II 
Asynchronous Transfer Mode 
American Telephone and Telegraph 
Automatic Digital Network 

Bit Error Rate Test 

Berkeley Internet Name Domain 

Berkeley Software Distribution 

Command and Control 

Command, Control, Communications, Computers and Intelligence 

Computer Aided Design 

Computer Aided Engineering 

Computer Aided Manufacturing 

Computer Aided Tactical Information System 

Compact Disk 

Compact Disc Read-Only Memory 

Circular Error Probability 

Configuration Item 

Commander-in-Chief 

Commander-in-Chief, Atlantic Fleet 

Central Imagery Office 

Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff 

Commander, Joint Task Force 

Commanding Officer 

Common Operating Environment 

Combatant Command 

Communications Intelligence 

Communications Satellite 

Concept of Operations 

Continental United States 

Commercial Off-the-Shelf 

Computer Processing Unit or Central Processing Unit 

Constant Source 

Client Server Environment 



IX 



CUA 
CUBIC 

5D 

DB 

DCI 

DDN 

DDS 

DEC 

DIA 

DII 

DIN 

DISA 

DISN 

DISNET 

DISUM 

DITDS 

DMA 

DNI 

DNS 

DNSIX 

DoD 

DoD-STD 

DoDnS 

DOS 

DPI 

DSD 

DSN 

DSNET 



Common User Access 

Common User Baseline for the Intelligence Community 

Demand Driven Direct Digital Dissemination 

Data Base 

Director of Central Intelligence 

Defense Data Network 

Digital Data Service 

Digital Equipment Corporation 

Defense Intelligence Agency 

Defense Information Infrastructure 

Defense Information Network 

Defense Information Systems Agency 

Defense Information Systems Network 

Defense Integrated Secure Network 

Daily Intelligence Summary 

Defense Intelligence Threat Database System 

Defense Mapping Agency (new name NIMA) 

Director of Naval Intelligence 

Domain Name Servor 

DoDnS Network Security for Information Exchange 

Department of Defense 

Department of Defense Standard 

Department of Defense Intelligence Information System 

Disk Operating System 

Dots Per Inch 

DoDnS Standards Document 

Defense Switched Network 

Defense Secure Network 



Email 

EDP 

EEI 

ELT 

EOB 

EPS 

ERB 



Electronic Mail 
Electronic Data Processing 
Essential Elements of Information 
Electronic Light Table 
Electronic Order of Battle 
Encapsulated Postscript 
Electronic Review Board 



FDDI 

FIPS 

FITCPAC 

FM 

FTP 

FY 



Fiber Distributed Data Interface 
Federal Information Processing Standard 
Fleet Intelligence Training Center Pacific 
Frequency Modulation 
File Transfer Protocol 
Fiscal Year 



GCCS 

GDIP 

GENSER 

GFE 

GFI 

GFS 

GIF 

GIS 

GMT 

GOTS 

GPffi 

GPS 

GUI 



Global Command and Control System 

General Defense Intelligence Program 

General Services 

Government Furnished Equipment 

Government Furnished Information 

Government Furnished Software 

Grabbed Image Format 

Geographic Information System 

Greenwich Mean Time (Military ZULU Time) 

Government Oflf-the-Shelf 

General Purpose Interface Bus (formally HPIB) 

Global Positioning System 

Graphical User Interface 



HCI 

HF 

Hippi 

HiPPIE 

HPIB 

HQ 

HUMINT 



Human Computer Interface 

High Frequency 

High Performance Peripheral Imaging 

High Performance Peripheral and Imaging Enabler 

Hewlett Packard Interface Bus 

Headquarters 

Human Intelligence 



IAS 

IBM 

ICD 

EDBTF 

IDHS 

IEEE 

IMINT 

INMARSAT 

INTREP 

INTSUM 

IOC 

I/O 

IP 

IPU 

ISO 

ISSO 

JAMPS 

JBOC 

JCS 

JDISS 

JES 

JIC 



Interactive Application System 

International Business Machines 

Interface Control Document 

Integrated Database Transaction Format 

Intelligence Data Handling System 

Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers 

Imagery Intelligence 

International Maritime Satellite 

Intelligence Report 

Intelligence Summary 

Initial Operational Capability 

Input/Output 

Internet Protocol 

Intelligent Processing Unit 

International Organization for Standardization 

Information Systems Security Officer 

Joint Automated Message Preparation System 

JDISS Basic Operator Course 

Joint Chiefs of Staff 

Joint Deployable Intelligence Support System 

JDISS Embedded Support 

Joint Intelligence Center 



XI 



ncPAC 

JIMS 

niAP 

JMCIS 

JOTS 

JROC 

JSTARS 

JTF 

JTTC 

JUIC 

JVOX 

JWICS 

JWID 



Joint Intelligence Center, Pacific 

Joint Intelligence Message System 

Joint Intelligence Training Activity, Pacific 

Joint Maritime Command Information System 

Joint Operational Tactical System 

Joint Reserve Operators Course 

Joint Surveillance Target Attack Radar System 

Joint Task Force 

JDISS Tactical Troubleshooting Course 

Joint Universal Imagery Client 

Interactive Packet Voice Terminal - Secure Voice 

Joint Worldwide Intelligence Communications System 

Joint Warrior Interoperability Demonstration 



KFLOPS 

KHz 

KISS 



Thousand Floating Point Operations Per Second 

Kilohertz 

Korean Intelligence Support System 



LAMPS 

LAN 

LANTIRN 

LOC 

LOCE 

LOS 



LANTCOM (ACOM) Automated Message Processing System 

Local Area Network 

Low Altitude Navigation and Targeting Infrared System for Night 

Lines of Communication 

Linked Operations Center, Europe 

Line of Sight 



MASINT 

MAXI 

MC&G 

MCM 

MHz 

MIDB 

MIIDS/IDB 

MBLNET 

MIL-STD 

MIPS 

MISREP 

MIT 

MLS 

MNW 

MSS 

MWE 



Measurement and Signature Intelligence 

Modular Architecture for Exchange of Intelligence 

Mapping, Charting and Geodesy 

Multimedia Collaboration Manager 

Megahertz 

Modernized Integrated Database 

Military Intelligence Integrated Database System/Integrated 

Database 

Military Network 

Military Standard 

Million Instruction Per Second 

Mission Report 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Multi-Level Security 

Multiple Network Workstation 

Mission Support System 

Mount Whitney Experiment 



NATO 
NCA 



North Atlantic Treaty Organization 
National Command Authority 



Xll 



NFS 

NIMA 

NIPS 

NTS 

NISE 

NIST 

NITF 

NMHC 

NRT 

NSA 

NT 

NTCS 

NTP 

NVDET 



Network File System 

National Imagery Mapping Agency 

Naval Intelligence Processing System 

Network Information Server 

Naval Integrated System for Exploitation 

National Intelligence Support Team 

National Imagery Transmission Format 

National Military Joint Intelligence Center 

Near-Real Time 

National Security Agency 

Network Terminal 

Naval Tactical Command System 

Network Time Protocol 

Network Virtual Data Entry Terminal 



ONI 
0/S 
OSD 
OSF 



Office of Naval Intelligence 
Operating System 
Office of Secretary of Defense 
Open Software Foundation 



PACCMS 

PACOM 

PAL 

PASS 

PC 

PDN 

PIDF 

PMGB 

PMO 

POSIX 

PPM 

PROM 

PSN 

PTT 



Pacific Crisis Management System 

Pacific Command 

Process Asset Library 

PACOM ADP Server Site 

Personal Computer 

Public Data Network 

Paragon Imaging Data Format 

Program Managers Guidance Memorandum 

Program Management Office 

Portable Operating System Interface for Computer Environments 

Pages Per Minute 

Programmable Read-Only Memory 

Packet Switching Node 

Push-To-Talk 



RAM 

RDIST 

RF 

RFI 

RGB 

RISC 

ROE 

ROI 

ROM 

RTIC 



Random Access Memory 

Remote Distribution 

Radio Frequency 

Request for Information 

Red, Green, Blue 

Reduced Instruction Set Computer 

Rules of Engagement 

Region of Interest 

Read-Only Memory 

Real-Time Intelligence to the Cockpit 



Xlll 



SA 

SAFE 

SATCOM 

SCI 

SCIF 

SCMP 

SCSI 

SFUG 

SHF 

SI 

SIDS 

SIGINT 

SIO 

SIPRNET 

SLIP 

SOP 

SPINS 

ssc 
sso 

STS-I 
STU 
SUM 
SYS 



Security Analysis 

Semi- Automated File Environment 

Satellite Communications 

Sensitive Compartmented Information 

Sensitive Compartmented Information Facility 

Software Configuration Management Plan 

Small Computer System Interface 

Security Features User's Guide 

Super High Frequency 

Special Intelligence 

Secondary Imagery Dissemination Systems 

Signals Intelligence 

Senior Intelligence Officer 

Secret Internet Protocol Network 

Serial Line Internet Protocol 

Standard Operating Procedures 

Special Instructions 

Standard Systems Center 

Special Security Office 

Special Technology Support for Intelligence 

Secure Telephone Unit 

Software User's Manual 

System 



TACELINT 

TACO 

TADIL 

TAFIM 

TAR 

TCP/IP 

TDA 

TELNET 

TFUG 

TIBS 

TIDAS 

TIFF 

TRAP 

TRE 

TTY 



Tactical Electronic Intelligence 

Tactical Communications 

Tactical Digital Information Link 

Technical Architecture Framework for Information Management 

Tape Archive (also Tar) 

Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol 

Tactical Decision Aid 

Telecommunications Network 

Trusted Facility User's Guide 

Tactical Information Broadcast Service 

Trusted Intelligence-link Dissemination Access Server 

Tagged Image File Format 

TRE Related Application Program 

Tactical Receive Equipment 

Teletype Terminal 



UDP 
UHF 
UIDL 
UIMS 



User Datagram Protocol 

Ultra High Frequency 

User Interface Definition Language 

User Interface Management System 



xiv 



UPS 

USACOM 

USCINCLANT 

USCINCPAC 

USMTF 

USPACOM 



Un-interruptible Power Supply 

United States Atlantic Command 

United States Commander-in-Chief Atlantic (USACOM) 

United States Commander-in-Chief Pacific (USPACOM) 

United States Message Text Format 

United States Pacific Command 



VHP 
VMS 
VPN 



Very High Frequency 
Virtual Memory System 
Voice Product Net 



WWMCCS 

WX 

WYSIWYG 



Worldwide Military Command and Control System 

Weather 

What You See Is What You Get 



X11R5 

X.Desktop 

XDM 

XEDB 

XFTP 

XMIT 

X Windows 



X Window System Version 11, Release 5 (example) 

X Windows - Desktop 

X Display Manager 

Extended Integrated Data Base 

X Windows - File Transfer Protocol 

Transmit 

UNIX's GUI 



XV 



XVI 



EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 

The purpose of this thesis is to create a new user's guide for the Joint Deployable 
IntelHgence Support System's (JDISS) Communication and Images applications. This 
thesis is needed to assist new JDISS users by providing a central source of instructions 
for the two JDISS core applications which require the most help support for basic 
operations. This is accomplished by examining the core applications, Communications 
and Images, and identifying functions and processes that are difficult to understand, as 
well as functions and processes that lack sufficient instructions for new users. Using the 
results of this examination, descriptive, step-by-step simple instructions enhanced by 
illustrations and images have been created that target the new user. This effort was 
initiated after experiencing difficulties in learning and operating JDISS using the 
Computer System Reference Manual for JDISS, version 2.0 (CSRM, 1995). The JDISS 
Desktop and Utilities applications were included in the thesis since the first is a pre- 
requisite to the core applications and the second supplements the core applications. 

The JDISS Communications and Images Application Guide for New Users 
(Guide) approaches the problems of the new user in two ways: First, it provides an 
overview of the JDISS Desktop and utilities applications. In the JDISS Desktop section, 
the Guide discusses the standard graphical user interface (GUI) used on UNIX — X 
Windows. The new user is carefiilly guided through the basic functions and requirements 
of performing operations within X Windows with the specific purpose in mind of 
ensuring the user is comfortable with the desktop GUI, X Windows control fiinctions, 
and the various sub-menus and pop-up menus that the user will experience. In the 



xvii 



Utilities Applications section, convenient utility tools are provided which enable the user 
to expedite both local use to include file(s) manipulation and remote 
dissemination/retrieval of an assortment of products. Second, the Guide provides 
detailed "new user" type instructions for the communications and images applications. 
The instructions, although not all-inclusive, are simply written with many supporting 
images depicting the program responses to the user's inputs. Processes that require 
special knowledge, software, hardware, etc. or are beyond basic user needs, i.e., require 
advanced user knowledge, are not included and are not required for users to appreciate 
basic JDISS applications. 

JDISS has not just grown or evolved since its emergence, it has prospered and 
continues to have a bright future. A historic perspective and progression of the JDISS 
program starting with its inception at the United States Atlantic Command (USACOM) 
through today's JDISS applications and JDISS planned improvements as well as future 
applications to be demonstrated at the Joint Warrior Interoperability Demonstration 1997 
(JWID97) are provided. 

The JDISS program was developed to ensure that each of the U.S. services and 
agencies had a compatible intelligence system and one that would provide a common 
data standard permitting interoperability, both intra-service as well as inter-service use. 
JDISS is best described as an integrated set of commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) software 
applications including capabilities for word processing, e-mail, graphics, communication 
applications and imagery manipulation. The JDISS program is characterized as a DoD 
Intelligence Information System (DoDIIS) workstation providing tactical extension of the 
DoDnS network. DoDIIS is a federation of individual sites interconnected by a 



XVI 11 



worldwide network at the sensitive compartmented information (SCI) security level 
(Myers, 1994). JDISS was built in strict accordance with the DoDIIS profile with life- 
cycle management responsibility under the purview of the DoDIIS Executive Agent, the 
Office of Naval Intelligence (ONI). 

The JDISS Program Management Office (PMO) works closely with the Services, 
Joint Chiefs of Staff (J6), the Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) Office for 
Standards, and other organizations on the evolution of standards so that JDISS meets the 
full extent of interoperability requirements for a Joint Task Force's (JTF) warfighting 
environment. Ensuring interoperability between JDISS and interfacing systems is a 
major emphasis, as well as security accreditation, releasability and sanitization, and the 
integration of new functionality for future JDISS releases. (JBOC, 1996) 

JDISS is considered the coordinated intelligence community-sponsored system 
for providing intelligence to the warfighter. As stated, the purpose of JDISS is to 
provide the foundation for achieving strategic to tactical intelligence interoperability 
across services. However, none of this is possible without trained JDISS users. The 
JDISS system design allows almost any user with basic typing and fundamental computer 
skills to access the system through a common GUI desktop and an integrated group of 
standard applications. These interactive applications and their functionality are the power 
of JDISS. The descriptive, step-by-step JDISS Guide was developed specifically to 
target new users with no JDISS background. The new user, assisted by many instructive 
illustrations and images will be able to quickly learn and perform the basic operations 
listed above. As JDISS global use continues to expand, it is anticipated that this guide for 
new users will benefit future JDISS users worldwide. 



xix 



XX 



I. INTRODUCTION 

The purpose of this thesis is to create a basic user's guide for the Joint Deployable 
IntelUgence Support System's (JDISS) Communication and Images applications. This is 
accomplished by selecting the two core JDISS applications. Communications and 
Images, then examining the applications within the core applications to identify fiinctions 
and processes that are difficult to understand, as well as functions and processes that lack 
sufficient instructions for the new user. Using the results of this examination, descriptive, 
step-by-step simple instructions enhanced by illustrations and images have been created 
that target the new user. This effort was initiated after experiencing difficulties in 
learning and operating JDISS using the Computer System Reference Manual for JDISS, 
version 2.0 (CSRM, 1995). The JDISS Desktop and Utilities applications were included 
in the thesis since the first is a pre-requisite to the core applications and the second 
supplements the core applications. 

The core of this thesis is Appendix A, JDISS Communications and Imagery 
Application Guide for New Users (Guide). The Guide has four sections titled: JDISS 
Desktop; JDISS Communications Application; JDISS Images Application; and JDISS 
Utilities Applications. These sections provide the instructions necessary for a new user to 
learn and perform the basic operations associated with communicating between JDISS 
and non-JDISS terminals, performing real-time problem solving and analysis sessions 
with other JDISS users worldwide, transmitting and receiving data files, transmitting and 
receiving specific requests for intelligence data and imagery, and supporting digitized 



imagery exchange and manipulation. Appendix A is a stand-alone user's guide that may 
be removed from the thesis without affecting the content or the purpose of the guide. 

The Guide approaches the problems of the new user in two ways: First, it 
provides an overview of the JDISS Desktop and Utilities Applications. In the JDISS 
Desktop section, the guide discusses the standard graphical user interface (GUI) used on 
UNIX — X Windows. The new user is carefully guided through the basic functions and 
requirements of performing operations within X Windows with the specific purpose in 
mind of ensuring the user is comfortable with the desktop GUI, X Windows control 
functions, and the various sub-menus and pop-up menus that the user will experience. 
The JDISS Desktop application is a pre-requisite for learning to use the JDISS core 
applications Communications and Images. In the Utilities Applications section, 
convenient utility tools are provided which enable the user to expedite both local use to 
include file(s) manipulation and remote dissemination/retrieval of an assortment of 
products. Second, it provides detailed "new user" type instructions to supplement the 
Communications and Images Applications. The instructions, although not all-inclusive, 
are simply written with many supporting images depicting the program responses to the 
user's inputs. Processes that require special knowledge, software, hardware, etc., or are 
beyond basic user needs, i.e., require advanced user knowledge, are not included and are 
not required for users to appreciate basic JDISS applications. 

In addition, the thesis provides a chapter on the prosperity of JDISS. This chapter 
provides a historic perspective and progression of the JDISS program, starting with its 
inception at the United States Atlantic Command (USACOM) through today's JDISS 
applications and JDISS planned improvements and future applications to be demonstrated 



at the Joint Warrior Interoperability Demonstration 1997 (JWID97). As this chapter 
reveals, the JDISS program provides a family of software and hardware capabilities 
allowing connectivity and interoperability with the intelligence systems that support non- 
deployed and deployed forces in times of peace, crisis and war. JDISS provides the Joint 
Intelligence Centers (JICs), Joint Task Forces (JTFs), and other operational commanders 
with on-site automation support and the connectivity to make best use of the Intelligence 
Community's resources (JBOC, 1996). 

It is anticipated that this guide will benefit ftiture JDISS users worldwide. 



n. JDISS PROSPERITY 

JDISS is best described as an integrated set of commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) 
software applications. These common applications, combined with specific 
communications interfaces, guarantee interoperability between JDISS users from all 
services across strategic, theater and tactical warfare areas. A key to JDISS prosperity is 
its characterization as a Department of Defense Intelligence Information System 
(DoDIIS) providing a tactical extension of the DoDIIS network to the battlefield. 
DoDnS is a federation of individual sites interconnected by a worldwide network at the 
sensitive compartmented information (SCI) security level. It is also a term that applies to 
all information systems that process foreign intelligence without regard to classification 
level, source or sponsoring agency. In short, DoDIIS is a synergism of Intelligence Data 
Handling Systems (IDHS) with a state-of-the-art infrastructure (Myers, 1994). 

The JDISS Program Management Office (PMO) works closely with the Services, 
Joint Chiefs of Staff (J6), the Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) Office for 
Standards, and other organizations on the evolution of standards so that they meet the full 
extent of interoperability requirements for a Joint Task Force's (JTF) warfighting 
environment. Additionally, ensuring interoperability between JDISS and interfacing 
systems is a major emphasis, as well as security accreditation, releasability and 
sanitization, and the integration of new functionality for future JDISS releases. The PMO 
is committed to successfully meeting the real needs of the user community (Alves, 1996). 

This chapter is designed to provide the reader familiarity with JDISS and is 
written to promote interest in the JDISS program. JDISS has not just grown or evolved 



since its emergence, it has prospered and today has a bright outlook to the future. The 
chapter is divided into three major sections: JDISS Yesterday, JDISS Today and JDISS 
Tomorrow. JDISS Yesterday provides a brief but descriptive accounting of the 
development of JDISS. JDISS Today is the largest section and provides a summary of 
JDISS applications and information on why JDISS is a powerful intelligence 
communication and dissemination tool. The last section, JDISS Tomorrow, provides a 
review of the new capabilities that will be demonstrated at the Joint Warrior 
Interoperability Demonstration 1997 (JWID97). 

A. JDISS YESTERDAY 

In the early 1990s, the information systems staff of the United States Atlantic 
Command (USACOM) was challenged to field a COTS standards-based set of 
technologies to enable a JTF staff and down-echelon staffs to directly access theater and 
national DoDIIS assets. The prototype was first tested on the Commander-in-Chief, 
Atlantic Fleet (CINCLANTFLT) flag ship, the USS Mount Whitney. The "Mount 
Whitney Experiment" (MWE) consisted of a SUN workstation with the UNIX operating 
system connected via a shipbome network router and AT&T STU-III (secure telephone 
unit) to another STU-III and network router at USACOM. International Maritime 
Satellite (INMARSAT) commercial full duplex satellite communications were employed 
to extend DoDIIS services fi-om ship to shore. The MWE used COTS and Defense Data 
Network (DDN) Internet standard protocol, i.e.. Transmission Control Protocol/Internet 
Protocol (TCP/IP), to enable remote terminal connections. This allowed hardware 
independent operations. The MWE workstation was connected to DoDIIS International 
Business Machines (IBM) mainframes, such as the Semi-Automated File Environment 



(SAFE) and LANTCOM's (now ACOM) Automated Message Processing System 
(LAMPS), and to Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) based DoDIIS technology. The 
key was the use of COTS standards enforced within DoDIIS and DDN. The MWE Sun 
also had a COTS word processor (Word Perfect), electronic mail (Z-Mail), and an image 
manipulation/viewing package (Electronic Light Table Two (ELT-2)). The effort proved 
successful and became the predecessor program of JDISS version 1.0. It was initially 
deployed as LANTCOM's Deployable Intelligence System (LANTDIS). LANTDIS was 
the work of many DoDIIS information systems professionals within DoD, the MITRE 
Corporation and other supporting contractors. It was billed, "the most influential 
intelligence information technology program in history." (Myers, 1994) 
B. JDISS TODAY 

JDISS is considered the coordinated community-sponsored system to provide 
intelligence to the warfighter. This statement reflects JDISS objectives of jointness and 
interoperability and the desire to provide intelligence information to the operational 
commanders who need it when they need it. It is the purpose of JDISS to provide the 
foundation for achieving all service, joint strategic to tactical intelligence interoperability. 

The JDISS program establishes a standard core product for the DoDIIS to provide 
operational commanders with communications interface devices, virtual host emulation, 
office automation, map graphics, basic imagery manipulation, and access to host 
applications and data. As a tactical extension of the DoDIIS network, JDISS uses the 
Joint World-Wide Intelligence Communications System (JWTCS) for connectivity. 
JWICS is a family of networks designed to provide high speed, interactive, multimedia, 
IP-based secure telecommunications using dedicated intelligence communications lines. 



Installation and integration of JDISS at each end of a JWICS link permits the extensions 
of the DoDnS network capabilities to support deployed forces. 

JDISS is deployable using a laptop or desktop UNIX workstation and can operate 
wherever there is space for a computer and access to JWICS. It is scalable from a 
standalone workstation through a full client-server environment (CSE) implementation. 
JDISS provides: 

• Timely, secure and direct access to theater and national intelligence resources. 

• Transmission in real or near-real time via secure low bandwidth links. 

• Simultaneous duplex transmissions by numerous users. 

• Basic imagery analysis and dissemination capabilities. 

• Interoperability and easy input among different graphics formats. 

• Integration of JDISS as an application on tactical workstations. 

• Specific office automation and support functions. 

The result is an integrated group of applications, hardware platforms, packaging 
options and communications interfaces configured for specific intelligence needs. The 
equipment and software form a non-deployed and field-deployable intelligence support 
system that provides timely intelligence support to operational forces worldwide. 

1. JDISS Applications 

This section discusses the following five major JDISS applications: 
Communications, Electronic Mail, Office Tools, Images, and Utilities. JDISS is unique 
in that it provides the same look and feel to wide variety of users worldwide through the 
use of a common desktop, yet allows users the option to tailor a personal JDISS directory 
with command-specific applications. This gives JDISS users the best of both worlds: 

8 



joint interoperability through the use of COTS standards and configuration management 
of core appHcations yet access to command-unique applications from one workstation. 
These applications together form an integrated group. 

a. Communications 

The purpose of the Communications application is to provide several 
means of communicating or checking connectivity with other JDISS workstations. 
Communications is discussed in detail in Appendix A, the JDISS Guide. The 
communications pathway is normally JWICS, as discussed earlier in this chapter, but 
may be SIPRNET or any other communications link providing IP-based connectivity 
with another JDISS workstation. SIPRNET connectivity is an example of JDISS use at 
the SCI tactical level and the pathway for JDISS' integration into the Global Command 
and Control System (GCCS). Communications provides the following menu-selectable 
options. 

(1) Alert - Provides the ability to send short, high priority messages 
that demand immediate attention to another JDISS workstation. The distant JDISS 
workstation receives an "ALERT pop-up window" that requires the user to accept the 
message before continuing local workstation operation. 

(2) Chatter - Allows informal text communications between 
multiple JDISS workstations worldwide to assist in real-time problem solving, analysis, 
and dissemination issues. Communications will be at the same security level as the 
JDISS pathway being used and provides a flill duplex, interactive communications 
capability via the keyboard. 



(3) JPings - Provides the ability to check the communications 
pathway connectivity between the user's terminal and other JDISS terminals. 
Specifically, JPings can tell whether the user's terminal can "see" the intended recipient 
which means that JPings can also be used as a communications troubleshooting tool. 

(4) Collage - Provides an interactive whiteboard for sending screen 
grabs, images, graphics and text; as well as providing a corresponding chatter capability. 
If the Collage session is between only two terminals, drawings appear at the distant 
terminal as they are being drawn. 

(5) SLIP (Serial Line Internet Protocol) - SLIP is an alternative 
means of communicating with a distant JDISS terminal in the event the network is down. 
The most common alternative pathway when using SLIP is a dial-up modem over STU- 
ni. SLIP requires that both users work together to establish serial port to serial port 
connectivity. SLIP only works with JPings and Chatter. 

(6) JVOX (Interactive Packet Voice Terminal - Secure Voice) - 
Provides an interactive method between JDISS terminals to exchange secure voice 
messages. JVOX must be activated on the distant terminal and may be configured for 
either full or half duplex operations. JVOX may be used at the same time as other JDISS 
applications enabling real-time problem solving. 

(7) XFTP (X Windows File Transfer Protocol) - Provides the 
capability to transfer or search for files and perform various directory manipulation 
commands, both remotely and locally. XFTP is a X Windows graphical user interface 
(GUI) to UNIX's file transfer protocol (FTP). 



10 



(8) Send File - Allows the user to send and receive files from 
another JDISS workstation using a point and click window tool. Using Send File, the 
distant user must accept the file before it is transferred. This control of file transfers 
ensures that files too large for the receiving station can be rejected and that the receiving 
station knows that the file is now available locally. 

(9) XMIT (Transmit) - Allows users with different levels of 
computer expertise and system authority to use and configure the tartical 
communications (TACO) protocol. By using a sign-on mechanism, XMIT only shows 
the user the functionality permitted by his privilege level which is previously assigned as 
either a normal or privileged user. 

b. Email (Electronic Mail) 

Applix Email provides another informal mechanism to communicate with 
other JDISS sites, as well as other non-JDISS sites using IP configured networks. Email 
is fully integrated with other Applix Office Tools (covered in later sections). It allows 
the user to attach documents, images and spreadsheets for dissemination to one or 
multiple destinations. A powerful Email function allows use of both personal and shared 
Email messages which differ only in degree of Email accessibility: an individual or a 
defined group of individuals. Email is a simple point-and-click application tool and 
works similarly to other Email programs and are not addressed in this thesis. 

c Office Tools 

Applix Office Tools is an integrated office automation package that 
provides integrated access and use of Applix Word, Applix Spreadsheet and Applix 
Graphics (Interleaf, a document viewer using hyperlinked text, and Corel Draw are 

11 



optional programs). These basic office applications are identical to the Applix programs 
found on the GCCS main desk top window under Tools and are not addressed in this 
thesis. 

d. Images 

The purpose of the Images application is to provide the capability to 
accept and gather various imagery formats for display and manipulation for local use 
and/or dissemination to other JDISS sites. Images is discussed in detail in Appendix A, 
the Guide. The following is an overview of the three core and other optional applications 
within Images. 

(1) ELT (Electronic Light Table) - Provides users an image 
processor with the ability to view, manipulate, annotate, format and save or print an 
image or selected regions of an image. ELT can also support the TACO (tactical 
communications) protocol, scanners and video frame grabbers. ELT is discussed in more 
detail in Appendix A, the JDISS Guide 

(2) Imagine - Is an optional JDISS package that analyses or creates 
graphical models for mapping applications often incorporating information from the 
Geographic Information System (GIS) database. Although JDISS user's will see the 
Imagine icon on the JDISS main desktop, its special capabilities are not required by the 
common JDISS user and is beyond the scope of this thesis. 

(3) JUIC (Joint Universal Imagery Client) - Is a Mosaic document 
viewer that provides access to multiple imagery sources. When selecting JUIC, the 
JDISS Home Page will be displayed which lists several other Home Pages that access 
various imagery servers. JUIC uses HTML browser technologies in common use 

12 



worldwide. Further amplification is not provided or required for the purpose of this 
thesis. 

(4) Digital Camera - Is an optional JDISS package that inputs still 
photographic images into JDISS from the Kodak DCS 200 or 420 Digital Camera. This 
intelligence tool analyzes and creates graphical models for mapping applications and is 
beyond the scope of this thesis. 

(5) Hippi - Is a High Performance Peripheral and Imaging Enabler 
(HiPPIE) which provides an interface to ScanShop enabling images to be scanned into 
the system at various resolutions, manipulated and then saved and/or printed. Hippi also 
provides a SCSI (Small Computer System Interface) and GPIB (General Purpose 
Interface Bus) printer interface. Hippi is discussed in more detail in Appendix A, the 
JDISS Guide. 

e. Utilities 

Utilities are miscellaneous functions that allow users to print or save 
screens; import and export DOS files; display a time zone clock; access a calculator and 
calendar; set or change passwords; backup and restore files; etc. There are eighteen 
various utilities listed below that are available on all standard JDISS workstations. They 
are all covered in greater detail in Appendix A, JDISS Guide. 

(1) Backup-Restore 

(2) Calculator 

(3) Calender 

(4) Clipboard 

(5) Clock 

13 



(6) Dos Tools 

(7) Shutdown 

(8) Print Screen 

(9) Project Manager 

(10) System Load 

(11) Save Screen 

(12) CD-ROM 

(13) Time Zone Clock 

(14) Video Pix 

(15) Soft Window 

(16) Disk Stats 

(17) Set Password 

(18) Version (JDISS) 

2. JDISS Automatic Dissemination 

Although automatic dissemination is not a direct capability, the JDISS 
applications allow both automated "pull" and "push" of intelligence products between 
JDISS workstations. Both automated pull and push approaches are discussed briefly as 
well as the advantages of automatic dissemination a term which includes both automated 
Pull and Push dissemination. 

a. Pull Architecture 

Pull architecture is a systematic approach designed to take advantage of 
emerging data transfer technologies while easing the communications burden on 
traditional intelligence dissemination systems. Pull architecture allows intelligence 



14 



consumers to remotely access desired data at the time and place of their choosing as 
opposed to the intelligence producers "pushing" large amounts of information without 
regard to the needs of a specific user. A thorough knowledge of theater and national 
level intelligence products, producers and dissemination often is essential to maximize 
the benefits of Pull architecture. This information is available through the JICs or service 
intelligence centers and should be included as part of the deployment package. Pull can 
be automated (pre-specified searches or alerts) or manual (XFTP transfers, browsing 
home pages, etc.). 

b. "Smart" Push 

"Smart" Push complements Pull architecture. "Smart" Push is designed to 
more effectively use traditional intelligence dissemination methods for intelligence 
directed to individual warfighting activities. "Smart" Push is based on the understanding 
that not all intelligence consumers will have access to the Pull architecture and also that 
situations will arise that require broad-based intelligence dissemination (such as from a 
commander to his subordinates). Examples of "Smart" Push include the Tactical Receive 
Equipment (TRE) and the TRE Related Application Program (TRAP), which allow users 
to filter out undesired data, and the expanded use of CD-ROMS, which allow the 
replacement of standard hard copy publications. (JBOC, 1996) Additional examples of 
"Smart" Push for the warfighter could be manual (loaded to home pages) or automated 
(use of pre-selected methods to auto transmit intelligence to selected users by subject 
matter, location, etc.). 



15 



c. Advantages 

There are three distinct advantages of automated dissemination: First, 
tactical units have access to critical information in the field whether they are in peacetime 
(an exercise), crisis or war. Second, users have access to other timely information based 
on their local situation. This could be in the form of a daily intelligence brief or near 
real-time analyst-to-analyst exchange of information and ideas. Third, users can choose 
what best suits their needs and limitations because JDISS is flexible. For example, JDISS 
allows for multimedia format. But if a multi-media format is not necessary or host 
communications cannot support it, JDISS can provide the same information in simpler 
formats, i.e., plain text instead of color with graphics and audio. (JBOC, 1996) 

3. JDISS Client-Server Environment (CSE) 

A CSE offers advantages in the sharing of information and resources. Although 
JDISS can run on stand-alone workstations, a CSE offers the best opportunities for 
maximizing the JDISS applications by allowing real-time sharing of information between 
JDISS sites both local and remote. It is not necessary for a user to have an in depth 
knowledge of the CSE to use it but it will assist the user to better understand what 
resources are available and how they differ from a stand-alone workstation (JBOC, 
1996). A CSE consist of workstations called clients and resource providers called 
servers. A client workstation also performs local information processing and can serve as 
a local workstation. Communication networks provide the connectivity for the CSE and 
are an integral and essential part of the overall functionality and performance of CSEs. 



16 



a. Stand-alone Workstations 

Stand alone systems such as single workstations or personal computers are 
limited in their scope of operations or processing. They utilize their own processor to run 
programs or sort data and must have sufficient memory or disk storage to store the data 
for processing. While they may access other information on networks through a modem 
or communications link, they operate as an individual computing element. Typically 
everything a user needs is found on their workstations. The minimum requirements for a 
UNIX-based JDISS stand-alone workstation are listed in Appendix B, JDISS 
Workstation Requirements. (JBOC, 1996) 

h. Client-Server Workstations 

A CSE or architecture defines a relationship between users' workstations 
(clients) and computer resources (servers), which may provide services to the client such 
as file storage and access (file server), printing services (print server), communications 
services (communications server) or facsimile services (fax server). The client must be 
an intelligent workstation, such as a SUN SPARC station, with its own processing and 
storage power to allow for more timely local processing and some data while sharing the 
load or processing requirements with the server(s). The CSE relationship consists of a 
request by the client and server processing and a response by a server, followed by more 
requests, processing and responses. If the client requests specific data, a server responds 
by processing the request and sending the data to the requesting client. (JBOC, 1996). 

An important concept in CSEs is the ability of several servers to serve the 
same client (or many clients). CSEs operate in a shared processing and storage 
environment in which the clients and servers are sharing information via communications 

17 



links and networks. As more clients and servers are added, the capabilities of the CSE 
expand and more services become available. Therefore, communications and networks 
become an essential and integral part of CSE computing, thereby facilitating the transfer 
of information between the clients and the servers. The minimum requirements for 
JDISS client and server workstations are listed in Appendix B, JDISS Workstations 
Requirements. (JBOC, 1996) 

c JDISS Growth 

The Joint Staff has highlighted JDISS and JWICS in joint doctrine as the 
principal intelligence components for interoperability (JBOC, 1996). JDISS uses high 
bandwidth encrypted communications to move critical warfighting between the national 
level and the force level. JDISS can use virtually any available low to high bandwidth 
IP-based communications path. The key to JDISS today and for the future is its use of 
COTS standards. JDISS will continue to grow as the synergistic relationship between it 
and other intelligence and non-intelligence systems continue to improve. By building on 
standard applications and not systems, JDISS allows other programs to focus resources 
on the unique needs of the user. 

C. JDISS TOMORROW 

JDISS continues to improve and is now moving to JDISS version 3.0, a new 
deployable intelligence workstation based on the DII Windows NT (Network Terminal) 
configuration. By adopting the DII COE core as its infrastructure, JDISS version 3.0 is in 
the process of building an in-depth family of intelligence and collaborative add-on 
segments which can be reused in other Dll-based systems. This is important, if not 
critical, to JDISS's continued growth as the JDISS global use continues to expand. As an 

18 



example, over 3,000 JDISS licenses have been purchased and installed worldwide (DII- 
JDISS, 1997). 

The Joint Warrior Interoperability Demonstration 1997 (JWID97) is providing a 
means for JDISS to demonstrate its continued improvements to DoD in an integrated 
joint and coalition environment. JWID97 participation is important for the JDISS 
program since current COTS-based C4I systems are maturing and beginning to offer 
intelligence functionalities and low-end personal computers are running Windows NT 
and are beginning to be used in greater numbers for intelligence purposes. Other 
JWID97 participants need to know where JDISS is going with respect to the DII, how 
JDISS can already interoperate with Joint C4I systems and the capabilities of a JDISS NT 
workstation (DII- JDISS, 1997). The following JDISS JWID97 Demonstration Overview 
provided by the JDISS Program Office, 0NI-7JD, outlines several new and unique 
special features and possibilities for the future. 

The Dll-based JDISS version 3.0 will be demonstrated as an 
integrated family of plug-in intelligence support and multimedia 
collaborative software segments based on the DII COE (version 3.0). 
COTS Multi Level Security (MLS) and Trusted Web technology will be 
used to securely exchange intelligence data and to provide coalition access 
to web-based products and data. Several variants of JDISS will be used, 
including JDISS 3.0 as a Sun Sparc-based intelligence research 
workstation, the new JDISS NT deployable workstation which utilizes the 
DII Windows NT core, and embedded JDISS segments within GCCS 
(version 2.2/3.0). Various intelligence analysis tools convey with JDISS 
to support imagery exploitation, access to intelligence servers, file 
transfers, analyst chatter, etc. JDISS 3.0 Sun Workstations will feature the 
Multimedia Collaboration Manager (MCM), a prospective enhancement to 
the DII in the area of collaborative analysis and planning. 

Specific MLS solutions to be demonstrated include the JDISS 
Multiple Network Workstation (MNW), the JDISS Multiple Level 
Security (MLS) Trusted Web Server, and the Trusted Intelink 
Dissemination Access Server (TIDAS). The combination of these systems 
will be used to demonstrate point-to-point and multi-point dissemination 

19 



of intelligence from the U.S. and NATO to a Coalition (resident on the 
Coalition wide area network), and will allow participants on the SEPRNET 
to securely browse Web servers on the Coalition wide area network. The 
JDISS MSL Trusted Web Server will be connected to the SEPRNET, the 
NATO Linked Operations Centers, Europe, network, and the Coalition 
wide area network. This will provide a means for the MSL Webmaster to 
rapidly place Coalition-releasible U.S. and NATO information on a Web 
page accessible by any participant on the Coalition wide area network. 
The "low side" of the MLS systems will be audited by the Net Ranger 
COTS suite of intrusion protection hardware/software. The JDISS 
demonstration will also feature FORTEZZA user 

identification/authentication technology. (DII-JDISS, 1997) 

As stated above, JDISS NT version 3.0 capabilities will highlight 
communications, data exchange and interoperability with UNIX-based JDISS version 2.0 
systems. But additionally, JDISS NT will have COTS MLS and Trusted Web technology 
which will be used to securely exchange intelligence data and provide access to non- 
secure web-based products and data. This will ensure that future intelligence operators, 
collection managers, and fusion analysts, whether deployed or not, U.S., NATO or 
Coalition, can perform and collaborate their analysis and reporting for the benefit of the 
Joint warfighter and decision maker. This is a very important and required capability as 
JDISS moves toward the twenty-first century and should ensure that JDISS will continue 
to be an influential intelligence information technology program. 



20 



m. SUMMARY 

JDISS provides access to timely, intelligence data for the decision-maker. It is 
capable of transmitting secure low bandwidth real or near-real time intelligence 
information simultaneously to multiple users using a variety of available communication 
pathways. JDISS performs real-time problem solving and analysis sessions with other 
JDISS users, transmits and receives data files, supports digitized imagery exchange and 
manipulation, establishes and maintains JDISS terminal links, enables secure 
communications between JDISS workstations and provides access to office tools and host 
applications. The JDISS program was developed to ensure that each of the U.S. services 
and agencies had an intelligence system which was compatible, a task that was 
accomplished by the use of common COTS standards assuring interoperability. 

JDISS is considered the coordinated intelligence community-sponsored system to 
provide intelligence to the warfighter. As stated, the purpose of JDISS is to provide the 
foundation for achieving strategic to tactical intelligence interoperability. However, none 
of this is possible without trained JDISS users. The JDISS system design allows almost 
any user with basic typing and fundamental computer skills to access the system using a 
common GUI desktop and an integrated group of standard applications. These 
interactive applications and their functionality is the power of JDISS. The descriptive, 
step-by-step JDISS Guide was developed specifically to target new users without a JDISS 
background. The new user assisted by many instructive illustrations and images will be 
able to quickly learn and perform the basic operations listed above. The Guide focuses 
on four of the six JDISS applications. Two core applications (Communications and 



21 



Images), a pre-requisite application to the two core applications (the Desktop 
application), and a supporting application (the Utilities application). As JDISS global use 
continues to expand, it is anticipated that this guide for new users will benefit fliture 
JDISS users worldwide. 



22 



APPENDIX A: JOINT DEPLOY ABLE INTELLIGENCE SUPPORT SYSTEM 
(JDISS) COMMUNICATIONS AND IMAGERY APPLICATION GUIDE FOR 

NEW USERS 



This appendix is submitted in a separate article under the title "Joint Deployable 
Intelligence Support System (JDISS) Communications and Imagery Application Guide for 
New Users'' The purpose of including this appendix as a separate file is to facilitate its 
use as a user manual. 



23 





Joint Deployable Intelligence Support System 

Communications and Imagery Applications Guide for New Users 



19 June 1997 



by 
Major Marlon F. Brown 



APPENDIX A 
TABLE OF CONTENTS 



1 JDISS DESKTOP Al-1 

1.1 Desktop Operation Al-1 

1.1.1 Graphic Lx)cator Device (Mouse/Trackball) Al-1 

1.1.2 Window Control Functions Al-2 

1.1.3 JDISS Main Desktop Window Al-3 

1.1.4 File Menus A 1-6 

1.1.5 Pop-up Menus Al-7 

1.1.6 Permissions and Ownerships A 1-8 

1.1.7 Naming Files Al-10 

1.1.8 Storing Files Al-10 

1.1.9 Icons Al-10 

1.1.10 Shared Directory Al-11 

1.1.11 Trash Al-12 

1.1.12 Log Out Procedures Al-12 

1.2 Conclusion Al-13 

2 JDISS COMMUNICATIONS APPLICATION A2 1 

2.1 Alert A2-2 

2.1.1 Activate Alert A2-2 

2.1.2 Send Alert Message A2-3 

2.1.3 Save Alert Message A2-5 

2.1.4 Respond to an Alert A2-5 

2.1.5 Close Alert A2-5 

2.2 Chatter A2-6 

2.2.1 Activate Chatter A2-6 

2.2.2 Begin Chatter Session A2-10 

2.2.3 Save Chatter A2-13 

2.2.4 Invitation to Chatter A2-13 

2.2.5 Print Chatter Session A2-14 

2.2.6 Iconify Chatter (NEVER De-Activate) A2-14 

2.2.7 Troubleshooting Chatter A2-15 

2.3 JPings A2-16 

2.3.1 Activate JPings A2-16 

2.3.2 Close JPings A2-18 

2.4 Collage A2-18 

2.4.1 Begin Collage Session A2-18 

2.4.2 Close Collage A2-21 

2.5 SLIP A2-21 

2.5.1 Begin SLIP A2-21 

2.5.2 Close SLIP A2-22 

2.6 Jvox A2-23 



A-i 



2.6.1 Activate Jvox A2-23 

2.6.2 Initiating a Call A2-24 

2.6.3 Close Jvox A2-25 

2.7 XFTP A2-25 

2.7.1 Activate XFTP A2-25 

2.7.2 Connect to Hosts A2-27 

2.7.3 Close XFTP A2-31 

2.7.4 XFTP Preferences A2-31 

2.8 Send File A2-35 

2.8.1 Activate Send File A2-35 

2.8.2 Acknowledge Receipt A2-37 

2.8.3 Close Send File A2-39 

2.9 XMIT A2-39 

2.9.1 Applications XMIT Supports A2-39 

2.9.2 XMIT Application Interfaces A2-40 

2.10 Conclusion A2-41 

3 JDISS IMAGES APPLICATION A3 1 

3.1 ELT A3-2 

3.1.1 Activate ELT A3-2 

3.1.2 JDISS Imagery Formats A3-7 

3.1.3 Image Manipulation in ELT A3-8 

3.1.4 Saving and Converting Images A3-19 

3.1.5 Print an Image A3-21 

3.1.6 Conclusion A3-22 

3.2 Hippi A3-22 

3.2.1 Scanning an Image A3-22 

3.2.2 Saving an Image A3-24 

3.2.3 Printing an Image A3-25 

3.2.4 Conclusion A3-25 

4 JDISS UTILITIES APPLICATION A4 1 

4.1 Backup-Restore A4-2 

4.1.1 Backup to Magnetic Media A4-2 

4.1.2 Restore from Magnetic Media to Hard Disk A4-3 

4.1.3 Backup and Restore Characteristics A4-4 

4.1.4 Close Backup and Restore A4-5 

4.2 Calculator A4-5 

4.3 Calendar A4-5 

4.3.1 Open Calendar A4-5 

4.3.2 Close Calendar A4-7 

4.5 Clock A4-8 

4.5.1 Open Clock A4-8 

4.5.2 Set Alarm A4-8 

4.5.3 World Map/Time Zones A4-9 

4.5.4 Close Clock A4-10 



A-ii 



4.6 DOS Tools A4-10 

4.6.1 DOS Copy A4-10 

4.6.2 DOS Format A4-1 1 

4.6.3 DOS Export A4-11 

4.6.4 DOS Import A4-12 

4.6.5 DOS Rename A4-12 

4.6.6 DOS Erase A4-13 

4.6.7 Eject Floppy Disk A4-13 

4.6.8 Close DOS Tools A4-13 

4.7 Shutdown A4-14 

4.8 Print Screen A4-14 

4.9 Project Manager A4-15 

4.10 System Load A4-15 

4.1 1 Save Screen A4-15 

4.12 CDROM A4-16 

4.13 Time Zone Clock A4-17 

4.14 Video Pix A4-17 

4.15 SoftWindows A4-18 

4.16 Disk Status A4-18 

4.17 Set Password A4-19 

4.18 Version A4-19 

4.19 Conclusion A4-20 



A-iii 



PREFACE 

The JDISS Communications and Images Application Guide for New Users 
(Guide) approaches the problems of the new user in two ways: First, it provides an overview 
of the JDISS Desktop and utilities applications. In the JDISS Desktop section, the Guide 
discusses the standard graphical user interface (GUI) used on UNIX — X Windows. The 
new user is carefully guided through the basic functions and requirements of performing 
operations within X Windows with the specific purpose in mind of ensuring the user is 
comfortable with the desktop GUI, X Windows control functions, and the various sub-menus 
and pop-up menus that the user will experience. In the Utilities Applications section, 
convenient utility tools are provided which enable the user to expedite both local use to 
include file(s) manipulation and remote dissemination/retrieval of an assortment of products. 
Second, the Guide provides detailed "new user" type instructions for the communications 
and images applications. The instructions, although not all-inclusive, are simply written with 
many supporting images depicting the program responses to the user's inputs. Processes that 
require special knowledge, software, hardware, etc. or are beyond basic user needs, i.e., 
require advanced user knowledge, are not included and are not required for users to 
appreciate basic JDISS applications. 

JDISS is considered the coordinated intelligence community-sponsored system for 
providing intelligence to the warfighter. As stated, the purpose of JDISS is to provide the 
foundation for achieving strategic to tactical intelligence interoperability across services. 
However, none of this is possible without trained JDISS users. The JDISS system design 
allows almost any user with basic typing and fundamental computer skills to access the 

A-iv 



system through a common GUI desktop and an integrated group of standard apphcations. 
These interactive apphcations and their functionahty are the power of JDISS. The 
descriptive, step-by-step JDISS Guide was developed specifically to target new users with 
no JDISS background. The new user, assisted by many instructive illustrations and images 
will be able to quickly learn and perform the basic operations listed above. As JDISS global 
use continues to expand, it is anticipated that this guide for new users will benefit future 
JDISS users worldwide. 



A-v 



APPENDIX A 

SECTION 1 

JDISS DESKTOP 



JDISS uses a Graphical User Interface (GUI), a windowing environment, as the primary 
screen feature. The GUI allows users to select options, move and manipulate data, and 
receive and disseminate information worldwide. All JDISS functionality is accessed 
through the desktop window, and since this is achieved through the UNIX X Windows 
capability on a JDISS UNIX workstations, a general overview of X Windows is provided. 

X Windows is the standard GUI used on UNIX systems such as SUN Sparc UNIX-based 
workstations. Like most UNIX applications, JDISS UNIX applications are hardware 
independent and may run on any platform that supports the X Windows environment. 
X.Desktop is an implementation of X Windows which is used on JDISS workstations. 
The X.Desktop part of X Windows provides a GUI environment which allows programs 
and files to be visualized as easily recognized pictures or icons allowing user input via 
point and click means. It also allows for customization or user organization of the 
Desktop to meet the specific needs of the user. (JBOC, 1996) 

Additionally, X Windows supports the Client-Server Environment (CSE) that is designed 
to operate with multiple computers or processors cooperating together. The server can be 
set up to offer shared processing and storage with the individual client or workstation. In 
environments, such as JDISS, most files and information are stored on the central server 
and not at the individual workstation. The X Windows environment is also designed to 
operate well over remote communications links and networks, another important feature 
for JDISS program applications. 



1.1 Desktop Operation 

The JDISS program creates windows in response to icon, menu option or function key 
selections. Some windows are temporary, while other windows need to be displayed, 
minimized or active for the duration of a user's session. Since many windows can be 
open at the same time, the user tells the system which window he wants to view or 
manipulate by placing the cursor in that window. The system acknowledges the window 
selection by changing the color scheme of the active window. 



1.1.1 Graphic Locator Device (Mouse/Trackball) 

JDISS uses a graphic locator device as the primary input device. The locator, 
hereafter referred to as a mouse (trackball), is used whenever possible for input and 
control functions. The mouse minimizes keyboard entry to the system and lets the user 



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concentrate less on the keyboard entry input and more on the actual task to be 
accomplished. For JDISS applications, mouse must contain three buttons. These buttons 
perform different functions utilizing the pointer to select graphic objects, launch 
applications, invoke functions, or select options. 

1. Left Button: The left button is commonly used to select menu options or 
objects on the display screen. 

2. Center Button: The center button is normally used for cut and paste operations 
in single or multiple applications. 

3. Right Button: The right button usually terminates functions or is used for pop- 
up menus within the system. 

For the purpose of this Application Guide, all instructions that apply to the left 
mouse button will be noted by the single word "click" (or double "click"). If the 
instruction calls for clicking either the center or right buttons, the words "center mouse 
button" or "right mouse button" will be used. 



1.1.2 Window Control Functions 

By using the mouse and cursor-sensitive icons, each of the JDISS windows can be 
controlled by the following associated functions (see Fig. 1.1 for a sample window). 

1 . To activate a window, merely position the pointer with the mouse within the 
window. 

2. To resize a window (change the height or width), place the pointer anywhere 
on the window frame except the comers, click and hold — the cursor will change from a 
northwest pointing arrow to an arrow that is pointing toward and touching the window 
frame. Keep holding the button and drag the window frame to expand or contract it to the 
desired position. When you are satisfied with the window size, release the button to 
freeze the window size. 

3. To minimize a window (shrink a window to icon size), click on the window's 
minimize button. Minimize is used as a means of managing your desktop space. The 
minimize button is the dot symbol second from the right appearing in the upper right 
portion of any window. 

4. To make a window fill up your entire screen (maximize), click on the 
maximize button. The maximize button is the square symbol located just to the right of 
the minimize button. 



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5. To scale a window (change the height and width at the same time), place the 
pointer on a window frame comer, click and hold — the cursor will change from a 
northwest pointing arrow to an arrow pointing into a comer. Keep holding the button and 
drag the comer to the desired position. The length and width of the window will change 
together as you drag the comer. When you are satisfied with the window size, release the 
button to freeze the window. 

6. To reposition a window, place the cursor on the title bar, click the left or 
middle mouse button and drag the window to the desired location. Do not drag from the 
comers. The cursor will change from a northwest pointing arrow to four arrows pointing 
away from the mutual center. Keep holding the button while dragging the window to the 
desired position. When you are satisfied with the window position, release the button to 
drop the window at the current location. 

7. Most windows incorporate at least one pulldown menu (list or function set) 
from which sub-functions can be invoked. A menu option is selected by placing the 
locator over the desired option and clicking. The menu also shows "Accelerator" key 
combinations that will invoke the window functions by using the keyboard instead of the 
mouse. 

8. Windows will frequently overlap on another and may be brought to the 
foreground (top window) or sent to the background. To position the window, simply 
position the cursor within the window screen background (not the desktop free space) and 
click the right mouse button. This will bring up the Workstation Main Menu. Select 
Window Operations and a cascade menu will appear. Choose shuffle up or shuffle down 
depending on what you want to do. Also, simply clicking on any edge of a window will 
bring it to the foreground, shuffling other overlapping windows to the background. 

9. To close a window either double click on the minus sign in the upper left 
comer or select File and Exit. 



1.1.3 JDISS Main Desktop Window 

The picture below shows the main components of the JDISS Main Desktop 
window, as it appears when you first open JDISS. It is a window where the user groups 
icons to organize his work. 



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Figure 1.1 (JDISS Main Desktop) 

JDISS applications can also be selected using the workstation JDISS Main Menu 
shown below. To bring up the workstation JDISS Main Menu, place the cursor anywhere 
within the JDISS window screen background and click with the right mouse button. 



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There are sixteen options within the Workstation Menu for 
the typical JDISS user. The seventeenth option (ISSO 
Access) is only for a trusted user. The first ten options 
reflect the DoDHS/JDISS Desktop icons which are also 
displayed as icons on the JDISS Main Desktop window. 
This pop-up menu was developed as an alternative and 
quick way for users to initiate JDISS applications without 
having to bring the JDISS Main Desktop window back to 
the foreground. 



Figure 1.2 (JDISS Main Menu) 



All sixteen options on the JDISS Main Menu are discussed in the JDISS Help 
function. The Communications, Images and Utilities applications are also discussed in 



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detail later in the Application Guide. The last seven are not found as icons. Six of these 
seven options are very convenient for the new user (ISSO Access is for trusted users 
only). They are listed below as a ready reference for new user convenience. 

1 . Print: Utilized to print out standard ASCII files to either the local or remote 
printer depending on currently selected printer. 

2. Printer Status: The printer status window shown in Fig. 1.3 allows the user to 
check the status of and manipulate all print jobs. 









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Figure 1.3 (Printer Status) 

The printer status window has three sections. The top left comer shows a list of 
printers from which to select. The top right comer displays the status of the selected 
printer, the bottom window gives information on the different printer jobs. 

( 1 ) To update the printer status, select the Status pulldown menu and 
choose the Update option. 

(2) To remove Jobs, select the Remove pulldown menu and choose either 
Selected Jobs or All my (your_login) jobs. 

(3) To choose printers, select the Printer pop-up menu and choose either 
the real name or the alias for available printers. 

3. Screen Lock: Will provide security of your terminal, allowing the user to leave 
the terminal without logging off. User must re-enter his password to unlock the screen. 

4. Restart X.Desktop: Will restart the associated desktop with current session. 

5. Window Operations: Provides the following cascade menu. 

(1) New Window - Will bring up a terminal emulation (xterm) window 
allowing the user access to the UNIX command line. 

(2) Shuffle Up and Shuffle Down - Is another way to move your windows 
around. 

(3) Refresh - Redisplays existing windows. 



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(4) Restart MWM - Will restart your session as a Motif Window Manager 
(MWM) session if you are not already there. This option is used also to restart your 
session if refreshing the window was not enough to totally bring back your session to 
normal. 

6. Log Out: Will log your JDISS job out of the system. 



1.1.4 File Menus 

For the general user, the JDISS Main Desktop window contains the following four 
pulldown menus: 

1. File: The File pulldown menu lets you control the general operations of the 
objects on the desktops. The File pulldown menu items include: 

(1) Find - Used to search for specific files. 

(2) Save - Allows users to establish the look of their system desktop. The 
user can arrange the items in his work space in many different ways and 
then save this work space for future re-use using the save option. 
However, JDISS automatically overwrites the user's desktop before 
launching it, therefore, modifications to the user's desktop will only exist 
for the duration of the current login. 

(3) Save as - Saves a copy of the current desktop with a new name. 

(4) New Desktop - Creates a new, empty desktop. 

(5) Open Main Desktop - Opens the Main JDISS Desktop window. 

(6) Properties - This function is only available when at least one icon on 
the desktop is selected. If you remove the item using properties, the command will not 
delete the item from the system but it will be removed from the current window. If you 
remove an icon that is part of the Main Desktop, the next time you log in the item will be 
back in place. 

(7) Close All Directories - This option will close all open directory 
windows. 

(8) Close This Desktop - This option is used to close out the current 
desktop you are working on. This will not log the user out of the system. 

(9) Exit - Used to exit the Main Desktop. 

2. Edit - The Edit pulldown menu provides functions for selecting and putting 
back icons. 

(1) Get Out - Is used on desktops only.. The command is only available 
when at least one icon is selected. It allows the user to build a personal desktop without 
having to drag icons/files from one desktop to another. For example, to use Get Out, 



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select the Main Desktop icon(s) you need and then go to your personal desktop and 
choose get out and the icon(s) you selected will be placed into your personal desktop. 

(2) Put Back - Works similar to the Get Out option. Select the icons you 
want to put back to the Main Desktop and choose Put Back and it will put the directories 
back into their original assigned locations. 

(3) Select All - Selects all the icons on the desktop. 

(4) Deselect All - Deselects all the icons on the desktop. 

3. View - The View pulldown menu provides functions to determine how icons 
and directory windows will be displayed. The view menu also allows the user to change 
the layout of the icons. 

(1) Icons - This is the default setting. Shows each file and directory as an 
icon. 

(2) Names - Shows files, types of files and directories with their titles as 
mini-icons. The same operations can be performed with the mini-icons as can be 
performed with normal size icons. 

(3) Clean-Up - Neatly reorganizes icons of the desktop. 

(4) Reorganize - Reorganizes all the icons in the window, starting at the 
top left hand comer of the window. In the Main Desktop window, the icons will remain 
approximately in the same order as before. 

4. Options - The Options pulldown menu provides functions for customizing 
X.Desktops. 

(1) Main Desktop Preferences - Displays a cascade menu allowing the user 
to personalize the main desktop, color, font, patterns or configurations. 

(2) Desktop Preferences - Operates in the same manner as the Main 
Desktop Preferences. 

(3) General Preferences - Displays a cascade menu allowing you to 
personalize the dialogs, mouse, tools or devices. 

1.1.5 Pop-up Menus 

In addition to the pulldown menus available from the desktop and directory 
windows, the user can Pop-up Menus on the background of a desktop or directory. A 
Pop-up Menu shown in Fig. 1 .4 provides exactly the same commands as the desktop 
menu bars. 

1 . To activate the pop-up menus, press the right mouse button within a desktop or 
directory window. 



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Figure 1.4 (Pop-up Menu Bar) 

2. There are also Icon Pop-up Menus available. The Icon Menus "pop-up" 
whenever the user holds down the right mouse button on an icon. They provide the 
following functions relating to that icon. 




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(1) Activate - Activates the tools. 

(2) Properties - Displays information about the icons. 

(3) Copy to - Copies the icons to a specific directory. 

(4) Move to - Moves the icons to a specific directory. 

(5) Duplicate - Makes a second display of the icon in 
the directory. 

(6) Rename - Renames the icon. 

(7) Discard - Discards the icon by moving it into the 
trash icon. 

(8) Configure - "Tools only" 

(9) Check - Updates "pictures files only" in the 
memory cache. 

(10) Help - Displays help information about the icon, if 
available. 

(11) Stop - Stops a tool running, or closes the 
document editor 



Figure 1.5 (Icon Pop-up Menu Bar) 



1.1.6 Permissions and Ownerships 

For Security purposes, each user is required to have their own personal logon. 
Each file created under this log on is given certain permissions. The user can view 
selected permissions from the UNIX xterm window. Permissions are described below in 
Fig. 1.6. 



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d rwx rwx rwx 

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UNIX OWNER GROUPS ALL 

FH.FTYPE 

Figure 1.6 (Permissions) 

1 . The first letter is a UNIX file type which will commonly be either a "-" or a 
"d". 

(1) The "-" represents a plain text file. 

(2) The "d" represents a directory. 

(3) Other UNIX file types are available (see System Administrator or 
UNIX reference manual, e.g., X.desktop User;s Guide). 

2. The remaining portion describes the permissions available to: 

(1) Owner - The owner is usually the person that created the file. There 
may be only one owner. 

(2) Group - Each person having access to a logon in a UNIX environment 
will belong to a group. Most persons that have access to JDISS will fall into the JDISS 
users group. The permissions assigned to this area will be defined for those personnel 
that belong to the same group as the owner. 

(3) All - This is for personnel that do not belong to the same group as the 
owner. 

3. The permissions that are available are described below: 

( 1 ) The "r" represents a read capability. 

(2) The "w" represents a write capability. 

(3) The "x" represents an executable capability, usually programs or 
directories will have an "x" in each area (owner, group and other). This provides 
permission to "x"ecute programs, directory access, mailing lists, etc. 

4. Here is an example of a common file permission (see Fig. 1 .7): 

(1) The UNIX file type is file (not a directory or something else). 

(2) The owner has read and write capability for that file. 

(3) The group has read only or copy capability, but can not save to the file. 

(4) All others have read only or copy capability. 

-rw-r~r~ 

Figure 1.7 (Permissions Example) 

5. As an added note, it is also necessary to check directory permissions when 
viewing file permissions, e.g. if the file is writeable, but the directory is not, writing to the 
file will not be permitted. 



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1.1.7 Naming Files 

There are a few precautions you must take when naming files to ensure the file is 
saved correctly 

1. When naming a file in an application (e.g., ELT-2000, Applix, etc.), do not 
type the file extension (.pdf or .aw). The application automatically adds the file extension 
for you. If the user types an extension, the file will have a double extension (.pdf.pdf) 
when it is saved. 

2. When naming a file in a directory window, the file extension must be added. 
This is because a utility outside of the associated application of the file is being used. 
The following information should also be noted. 

(1) Changing just the extension of a file name will not 'convert' that file. 
You must use an import or export function. 

(2) ELT-2000 allows twelve characters, including multiple 'dots' and 
some special characters. 



1.1.8 Storing Files 

When storing files on a JDISS workstation shared with other users, it is always 
best to keep user specific files in the users directory. 

1 . When creating any file, remember to save it to your login subdirectory, e.g., 
"/home/machine _name/login" diieciory. 

2. Anytime after receiving a file in the /home/machine _name/shaiG directories, 
remember to move the file to your /home/machine _name/login directory. 

3. Remember to keep the share directories clear of your files to prevent the 
possible loss of your files and to keep the share directories as small as possible. The 
share directory is an excellent place to move files you make available to other users. This 
allows the user to maintain read only capability in personal files and directories. 



1.1.9 Icons 

The JDISS GUI uses two different types of icons. 

1 . A small rectangle (like the chatter icon usually located in the lower left comer 
of the screen). This type of icon represents an active window that is not 



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presently being utilized but may be needed in the future. A window in this 
type of display has been minimized but is still active. 

2. A cursor-sensitive stylized drawing (like the larger icons used for selecting 
JDISS applications). This type of icon represents a system object (a file, directory or 
software program). However, the primary purpose of this type of icon is to provide a 
means to execute the application which the icon represents. For example, to use any of 
the JDISS applications, move the pointer over the appropriate icon and double click to 
activate the application (hold down the right mouse button for the icon pop-up menu and 
select activate ). 

3. Icons surrounded by brackets are called "drop zone" icons. By selecting files 
and moving them to the drop zone, you may launch the application with the file that you 
dropped. 

For example, the printer icon in Figure 1.8, below is a "drop zone" icon. 




Figure 1.8 (Icons) 

4. The functions for manipulating icons are fairly simple. 

(1) To select an icon, click once. 

(2) To initiate that icon, double click. 

(3) To move the icon, click and hold, then drag it to where you want to put 
it (trash, desktop, directory, etc.). 

(4) To rename an icon (other that a system file), double click on the name 
below the icon, the area will highlight and the cursor will appear. Make your changes and 
click in the white space off the name to close. 



1.1.10 Shared Directory 

The Shared Directory icon found on the JDISS Main Desktop window that looks 
like a file drawer allows the user to navigate and access the files and directories held in 
the Shared Directory tree. To access a file directory: 

1. From the JDISS Desktop window double click on the shared directory. 

2. Double Click on the directory you wish to access, e.g., /Documents or /Images. 

3. Select the filename you wish to manipulate and double click on the icon. This 
will initiate the software package associated with the file and load the file automatically. 



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1.1.11 Trash 

The Trash icon found on the JDISS Main Desktop window that looks Hke a small 
trash can allows for the deletion or recovery of files. Once a file is placed into the Trash 
icon, it is not deleted automatically but is stored there temporarily (the Trash icon will fill 
up with paper). The file may be re-placed into the directory from which it originated or 
be permanently deleted. 

1 . To place a file in the Trash icon: 

(1) Select the file you wish to delete. 

(2) Click and drag the file to the Trash icon and release it when the hand is 
highlighted. 

2. To recover the file; 

(1) Double click on the Trash icon. 

(2) Select the file you wish to recover and click on the Restore option 
under the File pulldown menu or click and drag the file back to its original location. 

3. To delete the file: 

(1) Double click on the Trash icon. Select "Empty" from the File 
pulldown menu inside the Trash icon. 

(2) Once the file has been emptied from the Trash icon, there is no 
possibility of recovery. In the UNIX environment, the remove command is considered 
FINAL or IRREVERSIBLE. Be sure you do not want a file anymore before conducting a 
deletion. 



1.1.12 Log Out Procedures 

The JDISS application software keeps an audit trail of each user and the functions 
that are performed while that user is logged in. For this reason, users should log out at 
the end of their session. However, before logging out, save any changes that were made 
to the application being worked in or they will be lost. 

1 . Ensure that the cursor is in the screen background of the JDISS Main Desktop 
window and bring up the workstation JDISS Main Menu by placing the cursor anywhere 
within the JDISS window screen background and clicking with the right mouse button.. 
Select Log Out. 

2. The system closes down the JDISS environment and returns to the Login 
Prompt. 



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1.2 Conclusion 

Once installed, the JDISS applications are fully functional and can be activated by double 
clicking on their respective icons. The default settings provided during system 
installation will meet most user's and site's needs. The JDISS application software keeps 
an audit trail of each user and the functions that are performed while that user is logged 
into the system. If the user experiences problems during the session or an application 
does not perform, the user can refer to the CSE Console Window for any displayed 
system messages or error messages. Normally the CSE Console Window appears in the 
bottom right hand comer of the screen upon login. 

This section on the JDISS Desktop lays the foundation for the rest of the Guide since all 
JDISS functionality is accessed through the JDISS Main Desktop window. It is important 
for the user to be comfortable with the look and feel of the Desktop before continuing. 
Subsequent sections and their descriptions of JDISS applications are based on the user's 
working knowledge of the GUI. 



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APPENDIX A 

SECTION 2 

JDISS COMMUNICATIONS APPLICATION 



The purpose of the Communications application is to provide several means of 
communicating with other JDISS locations. Chatter and Secure Voice (Jvox) provide 
user-to-user, interactive communications while Send File and XFTP primarily transfers 
files between JDISS users. Alert provides a short critical message capability while JPings 
tests the communications pathway for connectivity. And Collage provides an interactive 
white board utility. All of these will be discussed in more detail in this section. The 
following icon is the JDISS Communications icon. 



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Figure 2-1 (Communications Icon) 

To access the Communications Desktop window from the JDISS User Main Desktop, 
double click on the Communications icon. The Communications Desktop window below 
allows icon selection of sub-programs. The programs will be discussed in the icon order 
shown. 



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Figure 2-2 (Communications Desktop Icons) 



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Alert is used for sending short, liigh priority messages that demand immediate attention to 
another JDISS machine. There are two types of alerts: Send Alert and Send Registered 
Alert. The only difference is Send Registered Alert returns an acknowledged window to 
the sender. 



2.1.1 Activate Alert 

To access Alert, double click on the Alert icon in the Communications Desktop 
window. The below Send Alert window will appear. 



sent. 




Figure 2-3 (Send Alert) 

1. The Send Alert window is broken into three sections. 

(1) The Message Area where the user enters the message information to be 

(2) The Reply Area which contains the responses sent by a remote user. 

(3) The Status Area which gives the user the status of the alert. 

2. Alert has three pull-down menus. 



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(1) File menu contains: 

a. Open File: Loads an ASCII file into the message area. 

b. Save Reply: Saves the text within the reply window. 

c. Disconnect from Host: Allows the user to disconnect from the 
host the user is currently communicating with. 

d. Quit: Exits the Alert Application 

(2) Send menu contains: 

a. Send Alert: Sends the Message area text to a remote machine. 

b. Send Registered Alert: Sends a registered alert to a remote user. 
When remote user acknowledges the alert message, an Alert Acknowledgment window 
is sent back to the originator. 

(3) Help menu: Provides on-screen help instructions. 
3. Alert has three command buttons. 

(1) Send and Send Registered: Both perform the same functions as the 
pull-down file menus. 

(2) Clear: Allows the user to clear the message area. This is especially 
useful when the user has another message to send. 

2.1.2 Send Alert Message 

To send an Alert, follow the following steps: 

1 . Click in the "Enter Message Here" portion of the Send Alert window — type a 
message. 

2. OR, instead of typing a new message the user may load an ASCII message into 
the message area by clicking on File and selecting Open File. Select the desired file from 
the Select File dialog window and click on OK. The ASCII file will load in the "Enter 
Message Here" window. 

3. Select the site to receive the alert message by clicking with the left mouse 
button on the Send or Send Registered button in the middle of the Send Alert window, or 
by using the Send pull-down menu and selecting either Send or Send Registered. The 
rConnect_popup window appears as shown below. 



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Figure 2-4 (rConnect Pop-up) 

4. Make a selection from the list of logged on users by either double clicking on 
the host name, or by clicking once to highlight the host name then clicking with the left 
mouse button on the OK button at the bottom left comer of the window. 

5. If you selected to send the Alert Registered format, the system at the distant end 
will receive the Registered Alert window, shown below. 

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Figure 2-5 (Registered Alert) 

6. Once the distant end acknowledges that the alert was received, the sending 
system receives a Registered Alert Acknowledged window, shown below. 




Figure 2-6 (Registered Alert Acknowledged) 



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2.1.3 Save Alert Message 

To save Alert Messages, follow the following steps: 

1 . From the Send Alert window, click on the File pull-down menu and select 
Save. The Select Directory Pop-up window opens. 




Figure 2-7 (Select Directory Pop-up) 

2. Enter the path and filename of the alert message to save. Click OK to save the 
file and close the window. 



2.1.4 Respond to an Alert 

To Respond to an Alert, perform the following. 

1 . From the Send Alert window, click in the Enter Reply Here area and type a 
response message. 

2. Click on Send to send the response. 

2.1.5 Close Alert 

To close the Send Alert window, click on the File pull-down menu and select 
Quit. The Send Alert window closes and the distant end receives the following Alert 
termination window. 



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Figure 2-8 (Communication Ended) 




Chatter allows informal text communications between multiple JDISS users world wide 
to assist in real-time problem solving, analysis, and dissemination issues. 



NOTE: 

Chatter MUST be active on the receiving end to establish a chatter 

session. 



2.2.1 Activate Chatter 

To access Chatter, double click on the Chatter icon in the Communications 
Desktop window. The desktop Chatter window opens as seen below. 







Figure 2-9 (Desktop Cliatter v2.0.1) 

Chatter has three pull-down menus. 
(1) File menu. 



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a. Rolodex - Rolodex Manager window allows the user to easily 
manage a list of users that are contacted often. It also allows the user to add, delete and 
modify Chatter or Talk users. 



nickname in JDISS v2.0. 
vl.Ol. 



1 . A user is identified by a user name, host name and 

2. A Talk user is JDISS v2.0 talking to JDISS vl.02 or 



b. Exit - Lets you exit Chatter. 



(2) Preferences menu. 

Will display a menu of chatter characteristics that the user can control. In 
general, these preferences define how Chatter will answer incoming calls, whether log 
files are kept, whether dialogs should show system files, and when Chatter should update 
the list of active chatter users. The Preferences menu contains: 

a. Answering Mode - Is a dialog that allows the user to specify 
what action to take when another Chatter user attempts to contact him. See below. 






Answer ivtcommg calls HilfeQu!: * ^i;^|^ asftog ">ot^J 



AitsweringMode 




stiOiBL -Accept I f^^iect the tnooming calE^ 



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sa 



Figure 2-10 (Answering Mode) 

1 . The user can have a conference automatically accepted or 
rejected with or without asking the user. 

2. The user can set a time limit which when expired will 
execute the configured action. Minimum time is 5 seconds, maximum time is 90 
seconds. 

3. After the user has made his desired configuration, click 
on Save and then OK. 



A2-7 



b. Logging - Allows the user to maintain a log of who has tried to 
call, who the user has tried to call, as well as, other system messages. 



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Ok 






.c^^^l^Mli 



Figure 2-11 (Desktop Chatter Logging) 



1 . Default directory for your log file is "/tap" but the 
logging dialog allows the user to designate the directory where the user wants the log files 
to be placed. 

2. Disable logging means the user does not want log files to 
be kept. 

c. Monitoring Interval - Allows the user to specify how often 
Chatter should check for the existence of other Chatter users. 






MoTikonn^lm&rved 



j_l 



. — r 






Oi 






Figure 2-12 (Monitoring Interval) 

1 . All the Chatter users in your Rolodex have monitor flags 
associated with them. If 'ON' (enabled) is set, then every "#" minutes Chatter will check 
for the existence of this user. If 'OFF' (disabled) is set, then no monitoring will be done 
regardless of the monitor flag. 

d. Send Sequence - If enabled, will treat the 'sequence' of 
characters as equivalent to selecting the Send button when in a conference. If not enabled 
then the send sequence will be stripped off before the data is sent. 



A2-8 



Send Se<pienc& For Bi^vadtl\ • j Uj ; 



':Ehabe SetidS^qu€f«. 



Ot 




Canufct:, 






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Figure 2-13 (Send Sequence for Default 1) 

e. Conference Name - The user can assign a default name to use for 
each conference you start. This default name will be used to populate the conference 
name entry field in the invite dialog. 



yi2-''"f5prc'^5r^'^'5^'^'>j<pjf^g'^F|^^ 










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Figure 2-14 (Choose a Default Conference Name) 

f. Audio - Allows the user to define how he is to be notified when 
someone invites him to chatter. Enabling this option will cause Chatter to beep when the 
user receives an incoming call. 

g. Confirm Data Loss - On exiting a conference. Chatter will 
prompt the user if the chatter conference has not yet been saved. 

1. Enabling this option will notify the user that the chatter 
conference data has not been saved. 

2. Disabling this option will cause Chatter to silently 
discard the data. 

h. Send on "<Retum>" - Enabling this option will treat the 
"<Retum>" key equivalent to selecting the Send button when in a conference. The option 
will send the line typed after each "<Retum>" instead of waiting till the message is 
finished and clicking Send. 



A2-9 



i. Show Hidden Files - Allows the user to define whether or not he 
wants file browser dialogs to show system files, or 'dot' files. Enabling this option will 
provide a listing of every file in a selected directory. 

(3) Help button provides on-screen help advise. 

(4) Command Buttons will be explained during the following discussion 
of how to use Chatter. 



2.2.2 Begin Chatter Session 

1 . To begin a Chat session, double click on the Chatter icon — the desktop 
Chatter v2.02 window below will be displayed. 

BB!'.WKii"^i'^'rea 



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Figure 2-15 (Desktop Chatter V2.02) 

2. Click on the Invite button. Invite is where the user selects other users he wants 
to chatter with. The Invite to a new conference window opens. There is a list of users, 
and their chatter type and status. 




Custom window , 



Area Manager window 



Hosts window 



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A-'>Z- 



m 









Figure 2-16 (Invite to a New Conference) 

(1) Within this window there are three icons shown by the arrows. 



A2-10 



a. The Custom window icon selects which chatter protocol to use. 
As shown in the window below, JDISS v2.0 accommodates Chatter, DITDS, and Talk 
protocols. 



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Figure 2-17 (Custom Invite to a New Conference) 



specific site needs. 



b. Area Manager window icon enables customizing of chatter for 



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Figure 2-18 (Area Manager Invite to a New Conference) 

c. Hosts Invite window icon is used to query host for logged in 



users. 



A2-11 



(2) Click on the Hosts Window icon. The Hosts Invite window opens. 
Enter the host name in the Hostname entry area or Click on one of the hosts listed, then 
select the Query command button to see which users are logged in. The User ©Host 
listbox is populated with users based on the query. 










Figure 2-19 (Host Invite to a New Conference) 

a. The User@Host field appears on the right side of the window. 
Click to highlight the address of the requested chat session, then click OK. The hosts 
invite window closes, and the User @ Host address appears under the Invite List of the 
Invite to a new conference window. 

b. To select multiple users, press the CTRL key on the keyboard 
and click over the entries in your Rolodex list. 

c. Click on OK to initiate a chatter session. The Invite to a new 
conference window closes, and the New session window opens. 




Figure 2-20 (New Session) 

3. The user can now start a chat session by typing in the lower portion of the 
window. Always start by identifying yourself, i.e., "This is Capt Drew . . ." then 
continue with the message. This is especially important if their are several user invites in 
the Chat session. 



A2-12 



2.2.3 Save Chatter 

1 . To save the chatter session, click on the file pull-down menu in the New 
Session window and select Save As. 



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Ca-w:*} 



Figure 2-21 (Save Chatter Buffer As) 

2. Use the directory displayer to specify the path where the file is to be saved. 
Click in the Filename area and type a filename. 

3. Click OK to save the chatter session to the specified directory. 



2.2.4 Invitation to Chatter 

1 . If the user is on the receiving end of a Chatter invitation, the user will receive 
the Invitation to Conference New Session window below. The user can either click on 
Accept to start a chatter session or click on Reject to end that Chatter Session. 




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has. iiivUvHl yinii In Clniitnimiir.o 

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Figure 2-22 (Invitation to Conference New Session) 



A2-13 



NOTE: 

If the site the user is trying to reach does not have the contacting 
user's machine listed in their host table, the user will be unable to 
talk with them (See 2.2.7, Troubleshooting Chatter). 



2.2.5 Print Chatter Session 

1 . To print a Chatter session from the New Session window, click on the File 
pull-down menu and select Print. The below Print window opens. 




2.2.6 Iconify Cliatter (NEVER De-Activate) 

1 . To quit a chatter session, you should first let the other participants know that 
you are going to disconnect. Following notification, click on the file pull-down and 
choose Leave Conference. 

2. To leave Chatter, click on the minimize button in the upper right hand comer 
of the desktop Chatter window, the session is ended and the Chatter icon will appear in 
the lower left comer of the JDISS window. Never de-activate Chatter because other users 
will not be able to invite you to a Chatter session. NOTE: The default for a newly 
opened JDISS Desktop window for Chatter is active with the Chatter icon located in the 
lower left comer of the JDISS window. 



A2-14 



2.2.7 Troubleshooting Chatter 

1 . The following Chatter information is added for troubleshooting and 
determining the meanings of various responses when trying to chatter. The message will 
be listed in bold with an explanation and action gouge following (action gouge, if more 
than one, is in the same order as the explanations): 

(1) Message: Unavailable 

a. The Unavailable message means either no one is logged on, 
chatter is closed, or no communication links are available. 

b. Solution: First 'ping' the machine to check communication 
path. Second, try the query option to see if anyone is logged on and then send an E-Mail 
asking the user to open Chatter and remind him to keep Chatter open. Third, Contact 
them via another method, i.e., telephone, radio, etc., to have the user log on. If no 
communication links are available, call the Communication trouble-desk to correct link 
problem. 

(2) Message: Invited 

a. The Invited message means that the user has chatter open and 
that a message is being displayed on the other machine that is inviting them to join a Chat 
session. 

b. Solution: This is a wait and/or send an email situation. The 
problem is the other user is either away from his machine or is too busy to accept the 
invitation. If they do not answer after a pre-set period, the invitation will timeout and you 
will get a status of declined. 

Following a time out, the user may send an email. The user can also remind the other 
user to enable the Audio function so that he is notified whenever there is a Chatter 
Invitation waiting. 

(3) Message: Declined 

a. The Declined message means that the invited user declined or 
that the chat session timed out, i.e., the other machine was invited, but no one responded. 
This happens fairly quickly if you are trying to chatter with vl.Ol and will eventually 
happen with a v2.0 machine. 

b. Solution: Send an E-Mail. 

(4) Message: Chatter Error 



A2-15 



a. The Chatter Error dialog window appears when the host name 
you entered is not vahd or there is no communication link to that machine. For the 
former, the user is not in your host table and/or he is not in the DNS server. 

b. Solution: Recheck the host name. The IP address may have to 
be entered in the Host Table if the machine is not on a DNS server. In the case of no 
comm link, wait until communications have been restored. Additionally, the user can 
'ping' the system to determine if communication links are down. The user can use both 
the IP address and the system name to ping. If the IP address pings good but the system 
name does not, then the user either has the wrong system name, DNS extension or it is 
not on the DNS server. 

c. In order to determine if a machine name and DNS extension 
(i.e., dia-oiccl .dia.ic.gov, centcomiwl.centcom.ic.gov) is valid, enter this in the Other 
window of Pings and see if you get a response. If the response is "host unknown," it is 
not valid. 




The JPings function is used to check the connection between the user's terminal (host or 
machine) and other JDISS terminals. Additionally, it is used as a communications 
troubleshooting tool. If the user experiences problems communicating with another site, 
JPings can tell whether the user's terminal can 'see' the intended recipient. 



2.3.1 Activate JPings 

1. To use JPings, double click on the JPings icon in the Communications Desktop 
window and the JDISS Pings window will appear. 



A2-16 



\JDiSSPbi^Intai--\_j\ ^ 



•i 

Hrgs: acJcct hosts 
S Qf E dispiaycd -^^ 



Uisplay htocio: 




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Figure 2-24 (JDISS Pings Intelligence) 

2. Select the host you wish to ping by highlighting the hostname with the mouse 
button. 

3. Start pinging by clicking on the File pull-down menu and selecting Start JPings 
or double click on the hostname. The lower portion of the window displays the JPings 
status. 

(1) A successful ping shows a green 'GO' circle. 



'fqaigto iqaoicft. jpteylH^ j 







"^ijiui. 




Figure 2-25 (Trying to Reach: GO) 

(2) An unsuccessful ping shows a red 'NO GO' circle, then the 'Did not 



connect circle.' 



A2-17 










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Figure 2-26 (Trying to Reach: NO GO) 



2.3.2 Close JPings 



After JPings has checked connectivity, click on the Dismiss button to close the 
Ping status window. 




2.4 Collage 

Collage provides a whiteboard service between JDISS v2.0 (or higher) systems for 
sending screen grabs, images, graphics and text, as well as, providing a corresponding 
chatter capability. 



2.4.1 Begin Collage Session 

1 . To access Collage, double click on the Collage icon in the Communications 
window and the Collage window below will appear. 



r 



CoBo ge 



-Enter Hostname: 



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Figure 2-27 (Collage) 



A2-18 



2. Enter the name of the host machine that you are logged into and select OK. A 
list of hosts participating in the session is displayed in the Participants' part of the main 
window. The current host will be the only user listed. 



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ersioh 1.3) 



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Sjit-ap-tnl \Z\\.yi 

Figure 2-28 (Collage Version #) 



I 



3. Click on the Collaborate pull-down menu and select Begin Session. The 
following window opens. 




Figure 2-29 (Begin Session) 

4. Enter the local hostname in the Your Name area. Collage will scan and pick 
an unused port to be used during the session. First you must enter a random port number 
(example 7890). This number must be between 1024 and 65535. After entering the 
number, click on OK. An Information window displays a message that a connection has 
been established with the Collage server. 






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Figure 2-30 (Information) 

5. Select OK and the window closes. At the distant end(s), the other user(s) 
repeat steps 1 and 2. From the Collaborate pull-down menu, select Join Session and the 
following window appears. 



A2-19 



JainS&sum 



t 



Your wa<Ty«^^j^'g^g^>^j^j^| 




Figure 2-31 (Join Session) 

6. The remote user(s) should enter the name of the host which started the session 
in the Host name of the Collage server field and '7890' in the Server port number field. 
Click on OK. The two (or more) terminals are now interactively linked. 

7. Any linked user can click on Window menu and select White board. The 
Public Whiteboard window opens. If Collage is connected between two systems, then the 
drawing or text appears at the distant end as they are drawn or typed on the local machine. 



lic^ 



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Figure 2-32 (Public Whiteboard) 

8. Select the pencil icon button in the Whiteboard window. Click and drag inside 
the large white box area. Lift up on the mouse button after dragging a few inches. A line 
is drawn in the white box area. The line drawn displays on the other host as well. 

9. Repeat on the remote host to observe the box being drawn on the local host. 
Several activities can be done interactively to include a chat session. 

10. From the Tools pull-down menu in the Collage main window, select Screen 
Capture. The mouse pointer changes shape. Move the mouse to the comer of the image 



A2-20 



or screen view to be captured and sent. Diagonally drag the mouse over the entire area to 
be captured. Release the mouse to end the capture session. A collage window appears 
with the screen capture/image. If interactively connected, collage also sends a copy to the 
distant end of the collage session. 



2.4.2 Close Collage 

1 . When ready the remote host can click on File and select Quit. The remote 
host's main window closes ending the Collage application. The remote user's name 
disappears from the Participants' area of the main window on the local host. The 
collaborative/sharing session with the remote host has ended. 

2. The local host can then click on File and select Quit. The main window closes 
ending the Collage application. 




The purpose of SLIP (Serial Line Internet Protocol) is to provide the user with an 
alternate means of communicating with distant JDISS systems in the event the network 
goes down. The most common alternative pathway when using SLIP is a dial-up modem 
over STU-in. SLIP requires that both users work together to establish communications 
and is basically a serial port to serial port connectivity. There are only two JDISS 
applications that will work with SLIP: JPings and Chatter. 

2.5.1 Begin SLIP 

1. Start SLIP by double clicking the SLIP icon on workstation #1. The first 
window that pops up asks you for the SLIP IP Address of the Local Machine. Use the 
default values that appear in the window. 



SSp 



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il 



rsr. 



Figure 2-33 (SLIP: Workstation #1) 



A2-21 



2. For workstation #1, enter the SLIP IP address of the local machine (example 
128.28.3.1). Click OK. The user can use the JDISS Manager to verify IP address if not 
known. 



Click OK. 



(1) Enter the SLIP IP address of the remote machine (example 128.28.3.2). 

(2) Enter the SLIP IP address of the distant machine. 

(3) Enter Baud rate, e.g., 9600. 



3. Make sure to cross check IP addresses. The local IP on system one is now the 
remote IP on system two. 

4. For workstation #2 enter the SLIP IP address of the local machine (example 
128.28.3.2). Click OK. 



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T : 





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CrU". :>: 1 



Figure 2-34 (SLIP: Workstation #2) 

(1) Enter the SLIP IP address of the remote machine (Example 
128.28.3.1). Click OK. 

(2) Enter the IP address of the distant machine. 

(3) Enter Baud rate. 



In the JDISS console window you should see something like 
"add host 199.98.x.x gateway 128.28.3.2." This means you 
have established a SLIP connection. The SLIP connection will 
work via serial port to serial port. A null modem cable with all 
25 pins can be used to test. 



2.5.2 Close SLIP 

Either workstation can select File from the main menu and then Quit. The 
window closes ending the SLIP connection at both ends. 



A2-22 




Jvox (Interactive Packet Voice Terminal ~ JDISS Secure Voice) provides an interactive 
method between locations to exchange voice messages in a secure manner. In order to 
receive incoming calls, the Jvox window must be either open or iconified on the screen. 
Jvox may be configured for either full or half duplex operations. 



2.6.1 Activate Jvox 

1. To access Jvox, click on the icon in the Communications window and the 
Interactive Voice Terminal window below appears. 




Figure 2-35 (/apt/jvox/jvox v2.0) 



A2-23 



2. Before making a secure call, the following steps must be followed to configure 
the application before activation. Click on the Configure button, the Configure window 
opens as shown below. 




baud). 



window. 



Figure 2-36 (Jvox Configure Pop-up) 

(1) Click on the Vocoder pull-down and select ALP2400 (Adaptive 2400 

(2) Select Software by clicking on the control button upper right comer of 



(3) Slide the Vocoder Frames per Packet selector to select how many 
frames per packet you, the user, desires. The more frames you choose, the clearer your 
voice will be received at the distant end. 

(4) Select either Real Time (as you speak) or Non-real Time (delayed 
slightly or if poor communications exists) from the Playback mode. 

(5) For the Comm Mode, select either Full Duplex (this is preferred mode 
because the user can transmit and receive simultaneously with the distant end) or Half 
Duplex (only transmit or receive can be accomplished at a time). 

(6) The PTT (Push to Talk) is defaulted to Toggled. 

(7) Following the desired selections, click on OK, the Configure window 
closes and returns to the Jvox main window. 



2.6.2 Initiating a Call 

1 . To initiate a call click in the Remote Party area of the Jvox main window. 

(1) Enter the remote user_id@ hostname (Distant end name@Distant end 
machine name), then click on the Call button. 

(2) The Jvox window displays the status for "Called . . ." If the called 
station does not respond within 30 seconds, the status in the Jvox window changes to 
"Idle" (Timed out, no response). 



A2-24 



2. When the distant end accepts a call by clicking on the Accept Call button in the 
window that appears, a Call Reply is sent to the originator. A display for Connected 
status appears at both ends. In full duplex mode, either party may click on the PTT 
button to send voice. In half duplex mode, only one party at a time may talk, then use 
PTT to send voice to the distant end. A 30 second timer initiates once the PTT is 
depressed. 




Figure 2-37 (Accept/Reject Call) 



2.6.3 Close Jvox 



When the users are finished with their conversation and want to terminate the call, 
either party can click on the End Call command button and the session will end. 



saw?.; 



2.7 XFTP 



XFTP (JDISS File Transfer Protocol) provides the capability of sending files between 
stations using the UNIX File Transfer Protocol (FTP). 



2.7.1 Activate XFTP 

1. To access XFTP, double click on the XFTP icon in the Communications 
Desktop window. The below XFTP File Transfer Utility window appears. 




i. 



^' , ,1 ,, , ... . ' . . ..'y . i^^. 



Figure 2-38 (LLNL.XFTP) 



A2-25 



2. XFTP is a graphical user interface to Unix's FTP. XFTP does not execute the 
local FTP program; instead, it directly communicates with the remote FTP servers. XFTP 
is an X client and follows the OSF/Motif look-and-feel. XFTP enables users to transfer 
files and perform various directory manipulation commands, both remotely and locally. 

3. XFTP's main window is divided into four main sections. 

(1) The Main Menu Bar. 

a. File menu. 

1. About XFTP - displays information about this version of 
XFTP. 

2. Quit - which terminates the application. 

b. Log menu. 

1. Clear Log - Clears the diagnostics log window. 

2. Save Log - Writes the contents of the diagnostics 
window to a user-specified file. The existing contents of the diagnostics window are not 
removed. 

c. Options menu. 

1 . Preferences - displays the user preferences. 

2. Viewer Preferences - displays the viewer preferences 
dialog. 

3. Save Preferences - saves the current settings of the user 
and viewer preferences. 

(2) The Diagnostics log, at the bottom, displays error messages and status 
information. If the status flag indicates that an error has occurred, refer to the diagnostics 
window for the details. 

(3) The file transfer controls in the center are Xfer Ops and Xfer Mode. 

a. Xfer Mode allows the user to select the desired file transfer 
mode by clicking the toggle button on ASCII or Binary (Use ASCII for plain text files 
and Binary for all other files). 

b. Xfer Ops has: 

1 . Copy button that transfers the selected files according to 
the mode specified in Xfer Mode. 



A2-26 



2. RCopy (Recursive Copy) button will transfer the user's 
selection only if it is a directory. The RCopy will transfer the entire selected directory 
sub-tree. 

3. View, if selected under Xfer Ops, the file selected can be 
monitored during the progress of the transfer. 



Remember the file is transferred according to the mode specified in 

Xfer Mode 



(4) The host sections are located on either side of the file transfer controls. 
XFTP can be connected to one or two hosts. The hosts may be any combination of local 
and remote hosts (the local host is the client host where XFTP is running). Each host 
section consists of four major elements. 

a. Connect menu - contains commands for 
connecting/disconnecting local and remote hosts. 

b. Dir menu - contains various commands for creating new 
directories, changing and displaying the current directory. 

c. Select menu - contains commands for selecting/deselecting 
entries in the current directory (the selections appear in the scrollable list of directory 
entries). 

d. Ops menu - contains several commands that operate on selected 
directory entries. 

2.7.2 Connect to Hosts 

1 . To get started, use the Connect menus to connect the two sides to the desired 
combination of local and/or remote hosts. 

2. Choose local or remote on the left Connect. If you choose local, your (local 
user) choices will be listed in the left Directory pull-down menu bar. 

3. Choose local or remote on the right Connect. If you choose remote, the dialog 
window prompting for host names, user names and password appears. 

4. From the Connect to Remote Host window, click on the desired host, then 
click on Connect. The below window appears. 



A2-27 



- j Coaawct- to Retstote Host 



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Figure 2-39 (Connect to Remote Host) 

5. From the User Name window, enter your (the user) name to log onto the 
remote system. Click OK when done and if the connection between the two systems is up 
the following window will display. 




Figure 2-40 (Enter User Name) 

6. Click in the Enter the User Name area to activate cursor and type your login for 
the remote system. Click with the left mouse button on OK. The system responds by 
requesting a password for the specified login name on the remote system as shown in the 
window below. When done, click OK. 




= ■ r 






Tyf »-, It'JN-Vt?! : B-f I 




Figure 2-41 (Password) 



A2-28 



7. Once the correct password for the specified login account has been entered, the 
XFTP window displays the connection to the remote system on the left side of the XFTP 
window (The user could have chosen either left or right Dir's - files can be moved in 
either direction). 






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Figure 2-42 (LLNL.XFTP) 




8. Once connected, traverse through the host's directory structure by doing one of 
the following. 



(1) Using the Directory Name menu (the menu just above the directory 



list). 



(2) Double-clicking on entries in the directory list. 

(3) Selecting an item in the Go to Previous Directory sub-menu in the 
host's Dir menu. 

(4) Selecting the Change Directory item in the host's Dir menu. 

9. Choose the Dir pull-down menu. Select Change Directory and change to 
different directories on the remote system. Make Directory provides a method of creating 
sub-directories on the remote system within the permissions set for the specified user 
login account. This is an interesting feature and one to remember when setting your 
permission set. 

10. You can obtain different types of views into a host's current directory by 
selecting either the Display Directory (Long) listed in the host's Dir menu (this long 
listing is for display and not selection) or the Display Directory (Table) listed in the host's 
Dir menu. Both selections are shown below. 



A2-29 



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Figure 2-44 (Tabular Directory List) 



11. From the right side of the XFTP window, click on the Connect pull-down 
menu. Select Connect to Local. The contents of the listed directory for the local system 
is displayed. 




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Figure 2-45 (LLNL.XFTP) 

12. Highlight the specified file(s) in either the remote or local machine by clicking 
on the filename(s) with the left mouse button. Once the files are selected, click on the 
Xfr (transfer) Mode radio button to select either ASCII or Binary mode (use ASCII for 
plain text files and Binary for all other files). 

13. To transfer the file(s), click on the Copy or RCopy under the Xfer Ops in the 
middle of the XFTP window to transfer selected files. The Verify Selection confirmation 
window displays. Select OK to transfer the selections. 



A2-30 



14. The File Transfer window provides an Abort button to cancel the file transfer. 
File transfer status displays in the lower portion of the XFTP window. Successful file 

transfer displays the file size transferred in a specified length of time. Errors in transfer 
are also noted in the lower portion of the XFTP window. 

15. Verify the file was transferred by viewing the contents of the target directroy 
in the XFTP window. The FTP'd file(s) should now appear under the target directory. 



2.7.3 Close XFTP 



To exit XFTP, click on File pull-down and select Quit. The session windows 



close. 



2.7.4 XFTP Preferences 

XFTP Preferences displays a dialog which allows the user to configure XFTP 
according to his preferences, shown below. There are numerous menu items associated 
with XFTP. Following is a list of the Options pull-down menus. The new user can leave 
Preferences at the default values. 



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Figure 2-46 (XFTP Preferences) 

1 . The user is presented with a number of configuration parameters, which are set 
by either toggling, sliding or typing. 

(1) Apply - causes the new values to take effect. 

(2) OK button - has the same effect as Apply, but the dialog is also closed. 



A2-31 



selected. 



(3) Cancel - undoes any changes made since OK or Apply were last 



2. The preferences can be preserved across XFTP sessions in a text file named 
".xftprc" in the user's home directory. The user may alter the order in which the 
preferences are presented in the dialog by the following. 

(1) Terminating XFTP. 

(2) Using a text editor to change the order of lines in ".xftprc". 

(3) Restarting XFTP. 

3. Add To Cache - Specifies whether newly referenced items should be added to 
the directory, quoted command, wildcard, and host/user caches. It is usually desirable to 
choose Yes. Choose No if referencing a series of seldom-referenced items that would 
clear the cache of your favorite entries. 

4. Anonymous FTP Password - Initializes the Pass word field of the Connect to 
Anonymous dialog if accessible via each host's Connect menu. 

5. Beep When Ops Done - Specifies whether to beep when each set of deletion, 
move, quoted command, and file transfer operations completes. 

6. Diagnostics - Specifies the level of diagnostics information to be written to the 
diagnostics log window. Choose one of the following. 

( 1 ) Quiet for error messages only. 

(2) Normal for error messages and success messages. 

(3) Verbose for error messages, success messages, and replies received 
from the FTP servers. 

(4) Debug for error messages, success messages, commands sent to the 
FTP servers, replies received from the FTP servers, and other assorted diagnostics. 

7. Directory Cache Size - Is the maximum number of previously referenced 
directory paths cached per host. The cache is preserved across XFTP sessions. 

8. Enhance Colors - Specifies whether to enhance the appearance of some of the 
graphical elements (such as scrolled lists and text fields) by changing the normal 
background colors. This preference has no effect on monochrome displays. Choose Yes 
to enhance the appearance, or No for the ususal Motif look. 

9. Enter Dir Upon Creation - Specifies whether to automatically enter a newly 
created directory. 



A2-32 



10. Host Cache Size - Is the maximum number of host to cache items. The cache 
is preserved across XFTP sessions. 

1 1 . Initial Logfile Name - Is the default file name to be presented to the user in 
the Save Log dialog. 

12. Initial Transfer Mode - Is the default file transfer mode (ASCII or Binary). 

13. Initial Wildcard Mode - Is the default mode of the User Wildcard dialog. 

(1) Choose Replace to make "Replace Filename Selection" the default. 

(2) Choose Add to make "Add to Filename Selection" the default. 

14. Inquire On Copy - Specifies whether to pop up a dialog that asks the user to 
confirm that the indicated transfers should take place. 

15. Inquire On Delete - Specifies whether to pop up a dialog that asks the user to 
confirm that the indicated deletions should take place. 

16. Inquire On Move - Specifies whether to pop up a dialog that asks the user to 
confirm that the indicated moves should take place. 

17. Inquire On Quote - Specifies whether to pop up a dialog that asks the user to 
confirm that the indicated commands should be sent. 

18. Left Auto Local Login - specifies whether to automatically connect the left 
side to the local (client) host upon starting XFTP. 

19. Max FTP Retries - Specifies the maximum number of retries XFTP will 
attempt if it receives a response from a FTP server that indicates the desired operation 
failed because of some temporary condition on the remote host. 

20. Max Time for FTP Reply - Specifies the maximum time, in seconds, the 
XFTP waits for a response from a FTP server before concluding that the connection has 
been broken. 

2 1 . Preserve Vms Ver Nums - Specifies whether to preserve VMS (Virtual 
Memory System) file version numbers when transferring files from a VMS system. This 
is only an issue for those VMS FTP servers that provide numbers (not all do). 

22. Print Password In Debug - Specifies whether to print passwords in the log 
window when the user preference Diagnostics is set to Debug. 

23. Quote Cache Size - Is the number of quoted commands to cache. The cache 
is preserved across XFTP sessions. 



A2-33 



24. Quote Placeholder - Is used as a placeholder in a quoted command to 
represent items selected in the directory list. 

25. The quoted command "stage 1 o" sends a STAGE command to the remote 
host for each selected item. 

26. Recursive Delete Enabled - Specifies whether to enable the Recursively 
Delete Selected Entry(s) item in the Ops menus. Choose No to help prevent accidental 
recursive deletions. 

27. Right Auto Local Login - specifies whether to automatically connect the right 
side to the local (Client) host upon starting XFTP. 

28. Sort Caches - Specifies whether to sort (by ASCII-collating sequence) cached 
items when they are displayed in dialogs. If Yes, then sort. If No, then the most recently 
referenced items are placed at the top of the list. 

29. Sort Long Lists By Date - Specifies whether to attempt to sort the long 
directory lists by time modified (with most recent listed first) instead of by name. The 
Yes option is considered unsafe because some FTP servers do not support this option and 
may give unpredictable results (Most UNIX hosts support this option). 

30. Store Unique - Specifies whether existing sink files are to be renamed before 
file transfer occurs. If Yes, then the existing sink file is typically renamed by appending a 
"." (period) followed by an integer between 1 and 99. 

3 1 . Symbols On Dir Entries - Specifies whether to append single characters to 
directory entries in order to distinguish their types. 

(1) The Yes option is considered to be unsafe because some FTP servers 
do not support this feature and may give unpredictable results (Most UNIX hosts support 
this option). 

a. If Yes (Unsafe) is chosen, "/" is appended to directories. 

b. "*" is appended to executables. 

c. "@" is appended to symbolic links. 

d. "-" is appended to AF_UNIX address family sockets. 

(2) If you are referencing a directory or directory entry whose name ends 
with one of the special characters, you need to select No (Safe) or when in doubt, select 
No (Safe). 

32. Use Last Dir At Login - Specifies whether to automatically enter the most 
recently referenced directory after connecting to a host. If this option is requested, but is 



A2-34 



not possible to perform (e.g., because the directory no longer exists), an error message is 
generated, and your home directory is entered. 

33. User Cache Size - Is the number of user names to cache (for remote hosts). 
The cache is preserved across XFTP sessions. 

34. Wildcard Cache Size - Is the number of wild card expressions to cache. The 
cache is preserved across XFTP sessions. 




2.8 Send File 

The JDISS Send File function allows the user to send and receive files from another 
JDISS workstation using a point and click window tool. The distant user must except the 
file before it is transferred. This control of file transfer ensures that files too large for the 
receiving station can be rejected and that the receiving station knows that the file is now 
available locally in his directory. 



2.8.1 Activate Send File 

1 . To access Send File, double click on the Send File icon in the Communications 
Desktop window. The below Send File window will appear. 









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Figure 2-47 (Send File) 



2. To send a file, select the directory from which to transfer files. It will be 
displayed in the SELECTION window. 



A2-35 



3. Click on the file to be sent from the Files window. The file will be added to 
the directory in the SELECTION window. 

4. Enter any descriptive information about the file you want the remote user to 
see within the TEXT MESSAGE window. Press the SEND FILE button. The window 
below will be displayed to ask for the File Type. If you do not know the file type, select 
OTHER. 




Figure 2-47 (File Type) 

5. Click on the Accept button. The File Type window closes and the File 
Information window appears. 




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Figure 2-48 (File Information) 

6. The File Information window is a dialog displaying the previous selections. 
Click Yes if all entries are okay. The File Information window closes and the rConnect 
pop-up window appears. 



A2-36 







Figure 2-49 (rConnect Pop-up) 

7. Click on the hostname to send the file to, then click on OK. The rConnect 
pop-up window closes. If the receiving JDISS machine accepts your request and there are 
no problems with their system, you will see the FILE TRANSFER COMPLETE window 
appear on your screen. Click OK. 

8. The user can send another file to this host or disconnect and send to a different 
host at this time. To disconnect, select the File pull-down menu and select Disconnect 
from Remote Host. 



2.8.2 Acknowledge Receipt 

1 . When a user is sent a file, he will first receive the Accept Send File window 
indicating a file is waiting to be transfer. Click Yes to acknowledge to the sender that 
receipt of the file is acceptable. 

2. The Receive File dialog window opens and enables you, as the receiving site, 
to control the number and size of files on your system. If your system cannot handle the 
size of the file, then you would now click No. 



A2-37 






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Figure 2-50 (Receive File) 

3. On the Select File window select where the file is to be saved, then click OK. 
The Select Directory window will open. Select a path name from the Directories listing 
on the left side of the window. Click on the filename to select the file, then click on OK 
to receive the file into the selection. Once the file is transferred, the sending system 
receives a notification that the file was received. 




Figure 2-51 (Select Directory) 

4. Once the file is successfully received, the File Transfer Complete window 
appears. Click OK to close the File Transfer Complete window. 



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Figure 2-52 (File Transfer Complete) 



A2-38 



2.8.3 Close Send File 

To close the Send File window, click on the File pull-down menu and select Quit, 
the Send File window closes. 




2.9 

The purpose of XMIT is to allow users with different levels of computer expertise and 
system authority to use and configure the tactical communications (TAC02) protocol. By 
using a sign-on mechanism, XMIT only shows the user the functionality permitted by his 
privilege level which is previously assigned as either a normal or privileged user (XMIT 
is normally for only the experienced user). 



2.9.1 Applications XMIT Supports 

1 . XMIT distinguishes between Normal and Privileged users by providing a 
sign-on mechanism that will allow it to group the users into two classes. 

(1) Normal users (Operators) will be restricted to using the application to 
send and receive files, ping other sites, do a bit error rate test (BERT), and pull files. 

(2) Privileged users (Administrators) may also use the application to 
configure both TAC02 and additional users. 



The application will only show the 
user the functionality permitted by 
his privilege level. 



2. The Send File is one of XMIT's primary functions. It allows the user to select 
a group of files and queue them for transmission to a remote site. 

3. The other primary function is Receive File. It allows the user to place the 
system in a standby mode such that it can receive files from any site in addition to 
attended receivables. 

4. Ping sites allows all users to ping an existing site to determine if that site is 
active. This will be used to determine if the user can send files to the other site. 



A2-39 



5. Configure TAC02 allows the user to configure the underlying TAC02 
software. This is XMIT's secondary function. All TAC02 configuration options will be 
available from within XMIT. 

6. XMIT allows multiple concurrent sessions of TAC02 to run. This enables a 
user to manage many tasks, like sending and receiving at the same time. 

7. XMIT will present a layered view of both the communications and 
configuration processes. This approach allows users at different levels of expertise or 
system privileges to access the underlying TAC02 software. 

8. UNIX Runtime Environment executes a UNIX operating system within XMIT. 

9. XMIT will make use of the X Windows and Motif layers to present it's user 
interface. 

10. The visual appearance of XMIT will follow the Motif and DoDIIS style 
guides. Where these style guides differ, DoDIIS has preference. 



2.9.2 XMIT Application Interfaces 

There are three XMIT Application Interfaces. 

1. The User Interface is designed with the user in mind. The user is able to 
configure as much or as little of the TAC02 system that is required based upon his 
expertise. 

2. In order for the information selected by the user to Interface to TAC02, the 
following actions must occur. 

(1) A Parameter File is created from the information selected by the user 
through the user interface. This file has fields as defined by the TAC02 program. These 
fields are filled in with the information selected by the user. Any field in which the user 
did not specify a value will be set to a default value as determined by the TAC02 
program (thus allowing users with different degrees of expertise to use the application). 

(2) The TAC02 Daemon Invocation sets up the mechanism to link the 
port/address to your process as communication can occur. 

(3) The TAC02 Invocation is the program that is invoked with a set of 
switches and input files, just like someone would invoke in any program under the UNIX 
environment. One of the input switches would include the parameter file just created 
according to the user's specifications. 



A2-40 



3. System Interface is the interaction between the program and the underlying 
UNIX operating system. The XMIT appHcation consists of a sub-program called "xmitl". 
The xmitl program provides a login mechanism. If the user enters a valid user_id and 
password, the xmitl program will automatically invoke the XMIT program. 



2.10 Conclusion 

Communications is the means by which the user pulls documents, pushes documents 
(files and directories), talks to other JDISS users using Chatter (text), Jvox (secure voice) 
or Alert (short text messages) and checks communication connectivity. In short. 
Communications allows real time or near-real time problem solving, analysis and 
dissemination of critical data and not so critical data depending on the need. The JDISS 
Communications Application connects the user to the outside world. 



A2-41 



APPENDIX A 

SECTION 3 

JDISS IMAGES APPLICATION 



Images provides the capability to accept and gather various imagery formats for display 
and manipulation through the use of five basic applications. The power of the Images 
application rest in the Electronic Light Table (ELT). ELT provides users the ability to 
manipulate a finished imagery product for local use or for dissemination. Manipulations 
include extracting sub-images, applying overlays and annotations and improving the 
images through a variety of spatial transformations and imaging processing. Another 
special Images strength is the two optional intelligence tools which are used for mapping 
applications. Imagine is a JDISS package that analyzes or creates graphical models while 
Digital Camera inputs still photographic images into JDISS for analysis. Additionally, 
Images includes the Joint Universal Imagery Client (JUIC) a Mosaic document viewer 
which provides access to multiple imagery sources and a High Performance Peripheral 
and Imaging (Hippi) enabler which provides an interface to ScanShop for scanning 
images into the system in various resolutions for manipulation. 




Figure 3-1 (Images Icon) 



To access the Images Desktop window from the JDISS User Main Desktop, double click 
on the Images icon. ELT and Hippi applications will be addressed in step-by-step detail. 
Imagine and Digital Camera are special intelligence applications and beyond the scope of 
the new user and this Guide. JUIC is an icon selection for the Mosaic program and 
requires no amplification for use. 



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Figure 3-2 (Images Desktop Icons) 



A3-1 



3.1 




JDISS uses Paragon's Imaging Electronic Light Table to view and manipulate images. 
With ELT you can sharpen, blur, transpose, rotate, invert, etc., an image or selected 
regions of interest, apply overlays and annotations, and extract sub-images. Images can 
be saved in several available formats (see paragraph 3.1.2 - JDISS Imagery Formats) for 
use with other image processing packages. 



3.1.1 Activate ELT 

To access ELT, double click on the ELT icon in the Images Desktop window. 
The ELT image processor will appear and disappear automatically. The Basic ELT 
window, shown below, will appear which has limited functions until an image is loaded. 



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A3-2 



1. The ELT window is divided into the following four main areas. The Menu Bar 
will be addressed within this section. The other three areas are covered in section 3.1.3, 
Imagery Manipulation in ELT. 

(1) Menu Bar - This contains a list of pull down menus divided into 
functional categories. 

(2) Tool Bar - The tool bar contains commonly used functions. The tool 
bar can be customized to hold icons for the functions the user most often uses. 

(3) Image Area - This is where images (including any overlay graphics) 
are shown. If an image is larger than the space available, the scroll bars at the bottom and 
right sides of this area can be used to see the hidden sections. The user can also stretch 
the entire ELT window to see more of the image. 

(4) Message Area - Displays the size of the image, the cursor position and 
pixel read out, as well as other relevant information. 

2. The Menu Bar has eight pull-down menus. Many of these have common 
functionality which the new user will recognize by name. Others are special applications 
which are worth user experimentation. However, these applications have default settings 
that will satisfy most new user needs. 

(1) File 

a New - Used when scanning in an image. Initially, a blank white 
screen will appear waiting for new image to be scanned (Image file name located within 
the banner will change and all ELT functions are now active). 

b. Load - Used to load an image from a file to the display. This 
function also loads the image into the gallery, discussed later. 

c. Unload - Used to unload an image. Will not delete the image if 
previously saved to the gallery and is a good option if a mistake is made. 

d. Save As - Provides several format options for saving images 
(See 

section 3. 1 .2, Imagery Formats). 

e. Delete File - Select from File list or type the file name and then 
click on Delete file. 

f Restore - Restores image from previously saved image. This 
allows user to recover from mistakes and allows the user to try different options while 
manipulating the image without fear of destroying the original image. 

g. Image Print - Prints the image. 

h. Image Scan - Inputs scanned image from scanner which is 
selected from the pop-up scanner list. 

i. Image Video - Optional (A special capability that requires a 
proper frame grabber and driver to be installed). 

j. Screen Capture - Captures or crops a smaller portion of the 
displayed image as a separate image. Screen will change to new captured image portion 



A3-3 



and will list new image as an image in the user's gallery (discussed later). Cursor arrow 
will change to a double plus sign. 

k. Export - The Help file states, "Provides peer application list" 
(Have found no requirement for this function — does not do what the user expects the 
function by name to do). 

1. Invoke - The Help file states, "Provides peer application list" 
(same as Export). 

m. Communications - May be used to send or receive imagery files 
between another ELT application located on another JDISS workstation. User must have 
the hostname in which to send a file and the medium that is going to receive the file in 
order to select the correct format and compression rate. User can send current viewing 
image or send from the list of files. Also, as a sub-function Remote Control allows two 
users on different terminals to work together on one specific image on ELT. 

n. Quit ELT - Terminates the session. 

(2) Edit 

a. Select All - makes everything in the document area active. 

b. Deselect All - opposite of Select All 

c. Other Selection - Will Give you a sub-menu. This makes 
selection of items possible when they are stacked or difficult to select with the mouse 
pointer. 

1. Text Strings - This will activate all text strings on the 
current image. Text is active when it is outlined with small white squares. The text 
selected by this method can be moved or deleted as a group (Other options — Lines, 
Rectangles, Ovals, Polylines, Images, Bitmap symbols - Same as Text Strings). 

2. Individual Symbols, text, images, etc., can also be 
selected by clicking on them with the mouse cursor. Multiple selections can be made by 
holding the shift key down as the user clicks on each additional selection. This allows 
you to select several different objects when All is not desired. 

d. Delete - Removes any active selection(s). An item is active 
when surrounded by small white squares. 

e. Cut - Removes active selection and stores the last items cut 
(Stores over any previously stored cut or copied item). 

f Copy - Copies active selection and stores last items copied (Copies over any 
previously stored copied or cut item). 

g. Paste - Adds last items cut or copied to image. 

h. Bring to Front - Moves the active item(s) forward on the image 
to include all other annotations currently on the image. 

i. Send to Back - Moves item(s) backward on the image. 

j. Alignment - Aligns all active items per selection from the sub- 
menu, i.e., vertical, horizontal, center, etc. 



A3-4 



k. Group - Groups all active selections. 

1. Ungroup - Ungroups the active group. 

m. Attachment - Provides sub-menu of Attach, Detach, Detach 
From, Detach All. These are similar to Group and Ungroup. By selecting annotations 
and the image, the user can attach the annotation to the image so that whenever the user 
again selects the image all attached items are active too. However, attachment, unlike 
group, still allows the user to individually select the annotations without selecting the 
group and having to ungroup to edit. Attachment works well while the image is still 
being manipulated. Group is better for final product and dissemination. 

(3) View 

a. View - Allows the user to either individually view or hide 
images, texts, lines, annotations, etc., or view and hide all by clicking appropriate 
selection. 

(4) Enhance 

a. Library Menu - provides several automatic transformations and 
image processing to image. A detailed description of each one is not required or needed 
for common users. Clicking on each will show you different enhancements, most 
unusable except for specific purposes. Remember the File/Restore function to return to 
the original image after each tried selection until you find the best transformation and/or 
processing feature for your use. 

b. Crop - Bad command — Should perform as a "crop" command 
and cut portion from an image. 

c. Enhance - Provides sub-menu of on-screen selectable percent's 
for changing scale of image. 

d. Convert to - Provides sub-menu of on-screen conversions to 1 
Bit Bi-level, 8 Bit Grayscale (normal), or 24 Bit RGB Color. 

e. Color-map Editor - Starts ELT Color-map Editor. For black & 
white photos, editor will be varying levels of grayscale. For color photos, color options 
are provided. Allows preview of changes before applying them to the image. 

f. Clip Gray Levels - Must have grayscale image to use (may 
convert using "Convert to" selection above). 

g. Brightness / Contrasts - Provides sub-menu that allows manual 
adjustment of brightness and contrast. 

h. Image Processing - Provides the same imaging processing found 
in the Library Menu. Used as a short cut selection. 

i. Edge Detection - same as Image Processing, 
j. Flip / Rotate - same as Image Processing. 

(5) Tools 



A3-5 



a. Copy document - Will provide additional copy in the gallery 
(Gallery found under Window menu). 

b. NITF Header - Provides pull-down menu to add header 
information to the image for future or transmitting requirements. 

c. Text Notes - Provides text window where the user can make 
notes about the image. Notes can be saved as separate file or attached to the image. Text 
Notes can also be selected by clicking right mouse button on the image (Press Dismiss to 
hide the notes. Delete will permanently remove typed notes). 

d. Image Info - Provides Read-Only information about image. This 
information includes image display level, size, data type, data size and security 
classification. 

e. Gallery - Provides miniature images of all images loaded into the 
Gallery. Selection can be made of image to be displayed by clicking on the image with 
left mouse button. All images loaded into ELT during the current user's session are held 
in the Gallery until the user quits ELT. This allows multiple images to be worked at the 
same time easily moving back and forth between images. Gallery is also used when using 
the Movie Loop function. 

f . Pan Viewer - Provides miniature image of current image in main 
window. This is particularly useful when the image is too large for the main display 
window. 

g. Movie Loop - Provides ELT movie loop control and movie loop 
display. This provides a slide show of images selected from the Gallery in any order 
desired. Number of times repeated and time each image is to be displayed is selectable. 

h. Preference - Provides sub-menu of following functions: 

1 . Colormap - Provides on/off selection of several colormap 
preferences. 

2. Zoom - Provides zoom methods of replication or 
interpolation (replication is preference of choice). 

3. Tool Bar - Provides modification of Tool Bar per user's 
choice. 

(6) Macro 

a. New - Opens sub-menu for ELT Learn Macro's. 

b. Load Macro - Loads macro from selectable directory. 

c. Manage - Opens sub-menu for managing and editing ELT 
macro's. 

d. Command - Provides message window for command input. 

(7) Window 

a. Refresh - Refreshes Image area. 



A3-6 



b. Compact Workspace - Moves image to left-upper comer of 
Image area. 

c. Enlarge Workspace - Centers image in Image area with 
maximum working white space. 

d. List - Lists all images loaded in the Gallery. Click on any image 
to load it into Image work area. 

(8) Help 



3.1.2 JDISS Imagery Formats 

1 . Paragon Imaging Data Format (PIDF) - ELT 2000 standard image format 
which is quick to load and quick to save and excellent for file transfer protocol (FTP) and 
E-Mail between JDISS terminals. This format is used to view the image in ELT-2000 
and is automatically executed when importing an imagery file from other various 
mediums. However, you cannot transfer or send the image to other Secondary Imagery 
Dissemination Systems (SIDS) in this format. 

2. National Imagery Transmission Format (NITF) - SIDS image format that is 
associated with Demand Driven Direct Digital Dissemination (5D). NITF is the universal 
format and viewed by ninety percent of all imagery tools. There are two different NITF 
formats (LI and 2.0), 1.1, unlike 2.0, cannot transfer color graphics. This format is 
necessary for transferring to another SIDS device. It is a good idea to create a directory 
for NITF images such as: /opt/5D/5D_files/NITF, after you have manipulated the image 
in ELT. 

3. Tagged Imagery File Format (TIFF) - Allows the transfer from UNIX based 
applications to IBM DOS based applications. A disadvantage is TIFF is larger to save 
than NITF and takes longer to load. 

4. Grabbed Image Format (GIF) - Allows the transfer from UNIX based 
applications to IBM DOS based applications. It also is large to save and takes longer to 
load. 

5. The below Figure 3-4, Formats Relative File Size, shows a comparison of the 
approximate file size of various formats based on an image data size of approximately 
700,000 bytes. The JDISS imagery formats are listed across the bottom of the legend. 



A3-7 



■ 


Formats Relati 


ve File Size 


.pgm 
.ntf 


y^ 


j0 ^^ 




/^^jpcxfNv 




/ ^ '""P 1 """"""""-^S. 




h Z:::^ 


pidf jgS 

■ .bmp ■ 

■ -tiff ■ 


^1 1 / 

■^ 1 pgm (ASCII) 1 1 

.eps ■ .pcx 
.gif H .pidf 



Figure 3-4 (Formats Relative File Size) 



3.1.3 Image Manipulation in ELT 

To load an image, select Load from the File pull-down menu, shown below, and double 
click on the image file desired. Express loading and start of ELT is also possible by 
clicking on the hnage icon in the Shared or Home directory. When the image appears in 
the document area, all functions of ELT are now accessible. 



:J^ 



rnM».p<ttl 



















; +*t*i* 






Figure 3-4 (ELT Load) 



A3-8 



1 . Locating previously loaded images is possible in any of the following methods. 

(1) Click on Windows and the list of imagery file names will appear at the 
bottom of the menu pull-down file. 

(2) Click on filename to view image. 

(3) Click on Tools and select Gallery from the pull-down menu or click 
on express icon on the tool bar. The ELT Gallery window will appear. Displayed will be 
a miniature view of all loaded images. Click on specific image to view. 



■.tw-vfvftt^'ti'emnfr-vfpvc m-vr^ 




Figure 3-5 (ELT - Gallery) 

a. For example, click on ship.pidf for viewing. 



A3-9 






■ (tftjclas^u^ EIJT - i&3Bpoidoptfmb2ifimc^gg^ypclhisp.i 



He-EAt >A«w Bihance Toots Macm VAndew 




Figure 3-6 (ELT - /export/opt/elt2k/images/Typel/ship.pidf) 



2. To zoom in or enlarge an image follow the following steps: 

(1) Click on the Express Line icon that has the number percentage and 
select a specific zoom percentage. 

(2) Click on Tools and select Preferences menu, then click on Zoom from 
the cascade menu from the pull-down. 



— XoamPrefErtnces 



2uom HaUwU 

■ tntitflwfciUufi 



OK ;: Cancal ; Help I : 



Figure 3-7 (Zoom Preferences) 



(3) The Zoom preferences are replication (default) and interpolation, 
a. Replication means duplication of pixels, making it grainier. 



A3- 10 



b. Interpolation attempts to make a best guess at what the pixel values should be 
between actual pixels in the image. 




Figure 3-8 (50% and Interpolation Selected) 

3. To Pan an Image follow the following steps. 

(1) Click on Tools and select Pan Viewer from the pull-down menu or 
click on Express Line icon. The ELT - Pan window will appear. 



SMC5X%S?2Si* 



■f-EEF—f^f 















vie ^ 



^^^sy^iT 




Dismiss 



Help 



Figure 3-9 (ELT - Pan) 

(2) Click on specific area inside pan window and the image in the display 
area is automatically updated. 

(3) Outline box in pan window tells you what portion of the image is 
being displayed in ELT Image area. For example, Select Zoom 200% and watch the red 
outline in Pan window change accordingly to show you how much of the Image is being 



A3- 11 



displayed. This feature is good to let you know how much of the image is hidden or what 
portion of the image you are focused. Actual image size can be seen by clicking Image 
Information under Tools menu. 



4. To Capture an Image follow the following steps. 

(1) Click on File and select Screen capture from the pull-down menu. 

(2) The cursor will change to a double plus sign. Starting at the upper left 
comer of the area you want to define, click and drag diagonally to the opposite comer. 
Release and the new image will appear. As shown below, the three helicopters were 
captured from the deck of the ship. 




Figure 3-10 (Screen Capture Image) 

5. Copy and Paste Captured Image can be accomplished by the following steps. 

(1) Ensure captured image is displayed. 

(2) Click inside image to make active (small white squares in comer show 
image active). 

(3) Click on Edit, select Copy from the pull-down menu and when the 
white squares in the comer disappear, the copy is complete. 

(4) Redisplay image you desire to 'paste to' from the Image Gallery or 
Window pull-down. 

(5) Click on Edit and select Paste, the captured image will appear. 

(6) The captured image is active and can be placed anywhere by clicking 
inside the captured image and dragging it to a specific area. As shown below, the 
captured image of the helicopters has been added back onto the original ship image. 



A3- 12 




Figure 3-11 (Ship Image with Captured Image) 

6. Image Enhancement is possible with the following steps. 

( 1 ) Click on Enhance and select Library menu from the pull-down menu. 
The ELT - Library window below will appear. Remember, as each button is tried, the 
original image can be restored by following the steps found in the Restore Image section. 
Most of these buttons will only show an improvement when using the original image. In 
other words, the image will normally become more and more unrecognizable if several 
enhancement buttons are selected, one after another. 




-:l 



Figure 3-12 (ELT - Library) 



A3- 13 



(2) Click on the Stretch / Contrast button. The contrast within the image 
will change and the following image will result. 




Figure 3-13 (Stretch / Contrast) 



(3) Click on Equal / Contrast button using the original restored image and 
the following image will result. 




Figure 3-14 (Equal / Contrast) 



(3) Click on the Sharpen button using the original restored image and the 
following image will result. 



A3-14 




Figure 3-14 (Sharpen) 

(4) Click on the Invert (White to Black) using the original restored image 
and the following image will result. 





Wl 








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5 'S. '■■^■* "'" 




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i^^g 



Figure 3-16 (White to Black) 

(6) Click on Enhance and select Brightness/Contrast from the pull-down 
menu or click on the express icon. The ELT - Adjust Levels window will appear, as 
shown below. 



A3- 15 




Figure 3-17 (ELT - Adjusts Levels) 

a. Click and drag buttons to desired Brightness and Contrast 
(results will be immediately observed). Click on Apply to set the image. 

7. To Restore an Image follow the following steps. 

(1) If image becomes unidentifiable due to various image enhancements, 
click on File, select Restore from the pull-down menu. The ELT - Restore window will 
appear. 



ELT- Restore Ima^ 



OK to restore thK^jroait .fexportftjptieJl^StAiwages/ry^ 
tfli pmvirHKdy savijtf copy? 



OK ; 



ifiBiVtygium 




Cancel i 



Figure 3-18 (ELT - Restore Image) 

(2) Click on OK and the image will be restored to the last time it was 
saved. 

8. To Annotate an Image the following steps should be followed. 

(1) Draw Palette. 

a. From the Express Line click on the Draw Palette. Directly 
underneath (i.e., the second line of icons) will be a display of available drawing tools. 



'^E 



A.B' 



^'^^rx^O^ 



)f fiO)< 100%--- ' l^- 

iQ \ ^c, C^/^l ^\l O O □ Une St/le Arrows \ \ 
Figure 3-19 (Available Drawing Tools) 



— ^ — __ — --OS 



A3- 16 



b. The drawing tools are affected by the currently selected line 
thickness and color. Make sure these are set before drawing. Choose the thickness and 
color you wish to use by clicking once on Line Style and selecting your choice from the 
available list. Click on Color outline and choose from the available list. 

c. Choose the tool which you desire to annotate with (line, oval, 
circle or box) by clicking once and moving the cursor to the area on the image you wish 
to annotate. Click and drag the mouse until the area you wish to be highlighted is defined 
and release the mouse button. For example, as seen on the image below. A blue box was 
selected using a solid line to highlight the Captured Image. A blue arrow was then drawn 
to show the area the Captured Image was taken from. A Red Circle using a dashed line 
was drawn around a dome on the starboard side of the ship. 




Figure 3-20 (Drawing Tool Annotations) 

d. To move a drawing tool annotation once it has been drawn, click 
once on the Arrow icon and click cursor on 0, 90, 180 or 270 degrees of the annotation 
item you desire to move. 

e. Drawn tool item will be active when it is outlined with small 
white squares, clicking on the white squares and dragging the mouse will re-size the tool. 

Clicking on the outer edge of the outline and dragging the mouse will reposition the tool 
item on the image. 

f. The tool items can also be made active by choosing Other 
Selection under Edit menu and clicking on Type (line, oval, circle, or box) of the item 
you want activated. However, this method will activate all items of that type within the 
image. 

(2) Text Palette 

a. From the Express Line, click on the Text Palette and directly 
underneath (i.e., the second line of icons) will be a display of available text tools (font, 
size and color). 



A3- 17 



Figure 3-21 (Available Text Tools) 

b. Select desired Font type, Font size, and color by clicking once 
on each icon and selecting your choice from the available list. 

c. Click once on the Insert text express icon, the cursor will change 
from an arrow to a "double capital T ", called a compass cursor. 

d. Move cursor to the display tool you have on the image, click 
once where you want the text to appear. Text cursor will appear directly above the 
compass cursor and will flash on and off. Type in desired text, then hit "escape" key to 
anchor it. As shown below, a title and names for highlighted areas have been added to 
the image in yellow. 




Figure 3-22 (Text Tool Annotations) 

e. To move or delete text once it has been entered, click once on 
Arrow icon and click cursor on any part of text. The text will be active when it is 
outlined with small white squares. Clicking on any part of the text and dragging the 
mouse will reposition the text on the image. Pressing "Delete" while text is active will 
delete it. 

(3) Region of Interest (ROI). 

a. From the Express Line click once on the ROI icon, directly 
underneath will be a new display on available ROI tools (pencil, polygon, or box). 



A3- 18 



Figure 3-23 (Available ROI Tools) 

b. Select desired shape, click and drag mouse over the image area, 
release and a ROI pink outline is added to image. 

c. Click on Show Information. A Histogram and Statistics will be 
shown of the ROI selected. 

d. Once the ROI is drawn, process it as a separate image by 
clicking on Convert ROI to Image. The Image will be outlined. Click inside the outline 
and drag ROI to any specific area of the image. As shown below, several items on the 
ship's bow where chosen as a ROI, processed and moved to the upper comer of the 
picture. 




Figure 3-24 (Ship with ROI Image) 



3.1.4 Saving and Converting Images 

1. Select Save As from the File pull-down menu. The ELT Save window will 
appear. 



A3- 19 




||«!fldt«tttt::.::3^i 




Figure 3-25 (ELT - Save) 

2. Select the /homo/machine _name/login_name/hn3.ges directory. 

3. Enter the image name in the file-name field or choose the image's original 
name to replace the image. 

4. Click on Format button, click on desired format (see available formats earlier 
in this chapter for best format). 

5. Click on Save button to write a copy of the image to disk. 

6. If you selected NITF, you will get an ELT-NITF Options window, shown 
below. 



A3-20 






ELi " NlfF 12 Optkms 




If? 







Figure 3-26 (ELT - NITF 1.1 Options) 

7. Click on appropriate selections and click OK. Image file now has been saved 
to the user's directory. 



3.1.5 Print an Image. 

1. Click on File and select imagePIUNT from the pull-down menu. The ELT 
Printer List appears. Click on the specific printer desired and then click OK. 




Figure 3-27 (ELT - Printer List) 

2. The ELT Printer Setup window automatically appears. Click on appropriate 
parameters and click on OK. The ELT Printer Setup Window will appear as shown 
below. 



A3-21 



&jO»tiMis 



ftiantefios: 




tttiai Hagc ijEC 






e 






Ti^ i ikiLfasK i*trgsTv tj.^ ti 



t«»r CarrBctlon - 



-P scale ■», - uRj 






1o«e. 




Figure 3-28 (ELT Printer Setup) 

3. Click OK. The image will be sent to the selected printer and printed. 



3.1.6 Conclusion 

The Imagery applications in JDISS provides users with the ability to manipulate finished 
imagery products, format imagery for re-dissemination, and printing of imagery from 
various mediums. Tailoring the finished products to meet the specific needs of your 
forces / units meets two critical requirements: Up-to-date imagery of the battlefield and 
expeditious dissemination of intelligence information. 



1^ 



3.2 



Hippi 



Hippi is a High Performance Peripheral and Imaging Enabler (HiPPIE) which provides an 
interface to ScanShop enabling an images to be scanned into the system in various 
resolutions, manipulated and saved and/or printed. Hippi also provides a SCSI and GPIB 
printer interface. 



3.2.1 Scanning an Image 

1. To access Hippi, double click on the Hippi icon in the Images Desktop 
window. The ScanShop window opens as seen below. 



A3-22 



SwKSkoi/(JM} - U^itiad 



m-. ' J^lfastaSsSMKSa.'^ar^^ 



Figure 3-29 (ScanShop (TM) - Untitled) 

2. Click on the Scan pull-down menu and select Setup to open the below Scanner 
Setup window. 



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JOW 




S<MmaxS€htfi 




m t W t' W.^Wf-m - a tw ■m -- m w m m - li ff^' ^g r ^^ 



Figure 3-30 (ScanShop Scanner Setup) 

3. After setting parameters (Parameters are similar to any other program), click 
on Preview and ScanShop will start a preview scan of the image. 

4. The Preview image will appear in the Preview Area as shown in Figure 3-30. 
The user can now select that portion of the image desired. At a minimum, the user should 
crop the smallest portion of the image (close as possible) to minimize the white space, 
thus reducing the byte size of the final image. Additionally, adjust both the brightness 
and threshold controls for the best image. For this example, only the "Apache" image is 
cropped. The selected area is outlined by eight small squares. 

5. After previewing, click on Scan. A final scan will now be initiated and the 
scanned image selected will automatically be transferred to the ScanShop Window below. 



A3-23 



ScanSh^(TM)-UntiiIed 




Figure 3-31 (ScanShop (TM) - Untitled) 



3.2.2 Saving an Image 

1 . Click on the File pull-down menu and select Save As. The Save Image 
window below opens. 



j — ,%cxuu%hry[^7Hff): Savufii 











?VwBt«a»trftttf.«ii-'mnrwT>rr,xtfc^: :.^:;%:^ j 



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i-ittet 



3 

CdTice) 



Figure 3-32 (ScanShop (TM) Save Image) 

2. Select the directory path where the file is to be saved from the left side of the 
window, click on the Format pull-down menu to select a file format. Enter the file name 
in the selection box near the bottom of the window. Click OK. 



A3-24 



3.2.3 Printing an Image 

1. Click on the Print pull-down menu and select Print. Image file is automatically 
sent to the default printer. 

2. If the user desires to select a different printer or change a print parameter, click 
on the Print pull-down menu and select Setup. The Setup window below opens. 




Figure 3-33 (ScanShop (TM) Print Controls) 

3. Set the specific parameters desired. The type printer is selected from a printer 
pull-down menu located in the top right comer. The other few choices are optional and 
easy to understand and select. 



3.2.4 Conclusion 

The pull-down windows are not addressed individually because the user will find 
standard features that are obvious as to function and use. ScanShop offers limited 
capability to manipulate but the user will find the rotate and view options helpful if the 
only purpose is to scan and print. However, if the image is to be saved following the scan 
for either local use or dissemination, the user can load the saved image into ELT for final 
processing and manipulation. 



A3-25 



APPENDIX A 

SECTION 4 

JDISS UTILITIES APPLICATION 



The purpose of Utilities is to provide the user with convenient tools in a single window. 
There are eighteen utility functions available on the standard JDISS workstation. Several 
of the Utilities are single function which are obvious by the Utility name. Others are 
versatile and require more detail to gain an understanding of their full benefit to the user. 
The following icon is used to access the JDISS Utilities applications. 




Utilities 



Figure 4-1 (Utilities Icon) 



To access the Utilities Desktop window from the JDISS User Main Desktop, double click 
on the Utilities icon. The Utilities Desktop window appears with the eighteen icons for 
the sub-programs. These programs will be discussed in the icon order shown. 



he htS _;^ie-'/ Opttor* 



Hsij 



4,- /-My 



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-h siai- 









iSqpt' t '^zifiAo' XI'DD^toci/MtffiB:^;.* : i £ cdtg ot-c^n 



[ED 



Figure 4-2 (Utilities Desktop) 



A4-1 




4.1 



Backup-Restore provides a means to backup and restore both personal and shared 
directories from hard-drives to a magnetic media as selected by the user. 

4.1.1 Backup to Magnetic Media 

1. Prior to accessing Backup-Restore, insert a floppy disk or 8mm tape into its 
appropriate drive and wait until the floppy disk or tape has been read (approximately 30 
seconds), then double click on the Backup-Restore icon in the Utilities Desktop and the 
Storage and Retrieval window appears. 




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Hard Disk 



Tape 



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i>^-i- 



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r t-T-itiHtct j-j . 

7 (.r rtJ I *.-.! 






mr:^ UI—-V . 



r~ 



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Figure 4-3 (Storage & Retrieval) 



2. Under the Hard Disk heading, click on the Quick Change Listing. On the left 
side of the Storage and Retrieval window, click and select the desired directory or scroll 
through the directory contents and select the desired file to be backed up. 

3. Under the Tape heading appears a list of devices that the system may use for 
storage. Click on the appropriate button to select the desired storage device. 

4. Click on Backup in the center of the screen and a window will pop-up telling 
the user the Tar (Tape Archive) tape is being created. At this point, the user can also 
cancel the backup by clicking on Cancel. 



A4-2 



j Operxttor CaiweUatio 

j_ Creating the tar tape. 
Interrupt 



CaiweJ 



Figure 4-4 (Operator Cancellation) 

5. When the backup process is done, the user will be alerted by a window. A 
copy of the selected file(s) will have been placed on the magnetic media that was chosen 
by the user. 



— JDISS Infitrmation 


■^ The badcgroutui process has Aiistied^l 


. 


i ok! 

i 


I 
i 







__ _ „ __, „., I 



Figure 4-5 (JDISS Information) 

6. To verify the file has been backed up on the appropriate selected media, click 
on File and select Restore Interface. Click on the center button that says Read Tape. 

7. The contents of the floppy disk/tape will appear in the window under the Hard 
Disk heading. 



4.1.2 Restore from Magnetic Media to Hard Disk 

1 . To restore files from (or view the contents of) a floppy disk or 8mm tape, 
select Restore Interface from the file pull-down menu. 

2. Click on the center button that says Read Tape. 

3. The contents of the floppy disk/tape will appear in the window under the Hard 
Disk heading. 



4. Select file(s), click the Restore button to begin a Restore. The window below 



appears. 



A4-3 



BasePtath 



.:^ 



Enter (iesired tJniectory name ^^ 



./ 



OK 



Cancel Help 



Figure 4-6 (Base Path) 

5. Enter the desired directory path, click OK, and the following window appears. 



Opemtor CanceBatwn 



RestCTB s^»:ted tieWrBCtories.-_s; 






Carsd ' 



Figure 4-7 (Operator Cancellation) 

6. The selected files will be restored to the previously chosen file path. Clicking 
the Cancel button will stop and cancel the Restore. 



4.1.3 Backup and Restore Characteristics 

1 . Tar (Tape Archive) - This command allows the user to write files to and from 
different file systems, to floppy disk or tape. 

2. Dump - This command allows the entire file systems to be written to tape. It 
also lets the user manage the information being sent to the tape by doing incremental 
dumps. 

3. Absolute Path - The user must include the full name of the file including the 
entire directory path. Always begins with a "/" (the UNIX root directory symbol), and 
may not contain special directory names. For example, the absolute path name for a file 
might be, /Home/Europe/England/Cambridge. doc. 

4. Relative Path - Assuming the user's current location is within a file's 
directory, then it is the actual name of the file within a directory i.e., the name that 
follows the last slash in the absolute path. Using the previous example, the name would 
be, Cambridge.doc. The relative path is like the absolute path except the user's current 
location is the relative pathname starting location while an absolute pathname always 
starts at the UNIX top level or root level symbol "/." 



A4-4 



4.1.4 Close Backup and Restore 

1 . To Close, select File and Close and the Storage and Retrieval window closes. 




Utilities provides a pop-up scientific calculator for user's convenience. To display the 
calculator, double click on the Calculator icon and the calculator window below appears. 




Figure 4-8 (Calculator) 




The Calendar provides the user with a month, a day-at-a-time and event, and an address 
book capability. 

4.3.1 Open Calendar 

1 . Double click on the Calendar icon and the synchronize calendar below appears. 



A4-5 



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< 



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r; fir ni 



;v ri :y^ :>b I 



n' .■^f ?i :i 



i 'i 



Figure 4-9 (Synchronize Calendar) 

2. Double click on a day and the Day-at-a-Time window appears allowing the 
user to establish appointments and set alarms. 





=1 — 




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r^ ^jj« _-•'>»■ _» > _t<c- >«t n^ ( H _^< 11= M 1 




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Figure 4-10 (Day-at-a-Time) 

3. To create an event for the calendar, click on Create Event. Ensure the correct 
day is highlighted in left hand window and click and drag on the desired time for the 
event. 



4. Type in Event Title in the center line window and click on Add to enter the 



title. 



5. Click on View and select Calendar View and event title will appear on the 
appropriate day. 



A4-6 



6. On Day-at-a-Time window, click on file and select Open Address Book. An 
Address Book window will open (not shown) providing spaces for a Name, Company, 
Phone Number, Fax Number, Address, Email Address, and Notes. 

4.3.2 Close Calendar 

To close the Calendar window, move the cursor to the Calendar window's System 
Menu button, click left to pop-up the System Menu, and click on the Close menu item. 




Clipboard provides a temporary storage location for text-only material copied from 
applications like Applix Word or typed directly. 



1 . Double click on the Clipboard icon in the Utilities Desktop to open the below 



window. 



j^s^^g^^gggg^^gggs^^^^ga-^ 



\ :ff>ijil?: (r>i£lliMj^:; r Nitw l : S^vm) ■ :•:: : .. ;;,. f ::v. . ,-^ [ij 



Figure 4-11 (Clipboard) 

2. Click and drag to highlight a block of text in a specific working document 
applications. 

3. Move cursor into the Clipboard window and click the middle mouse button. 
The highlighted text will now appear in the Clipboard window for editing. 

4. After editing, copy and move cursor to destination document i.e., text 
annotation on image, email, etc., and paste the text. 

5. Simply click Quit to close the window. 



A4-7 




The Clock allows the user to display the current time in Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) or 
"Zulu" Time Zone. The user can also select any area of the world and view their local 
time. Displays may be digital or analog format by selecting Edit and either Analog or 
Digital. 



4.5.1 Open Clock 

Double click on the Clock icon, and the current GMT will be displayed. 



C3ocfe 



i 



J-i^ 



_J 



i.rirTi 



. Alarm 



Figure 4-10 (Clock) 



4.5.2 Set Alarm 



1 . To change to the alarm display, click the left mouse button inside the clock 
window and the alarm display will appear. 



dodc 



i 



(LJ'-JLJ 

:'.:^;;;;;:;;.;: .Monday, June IS, -IS^. :;:;.: .:/;:^, ■ 



Figure 4-11 (Clock - Alarm Time) 



3. To set the Alarm, click the middle mouse button on a specific digit and it will 
be outlined as seen above over the "1". 

4. Change the digit by clicking the middle mouse button and the digits will 
advance to desired time — one hour per click. 



5. The Alarm will be a series of beeps and will be heard when the alarm time is 



reached. 



A4-8 



4.5.3 World Map/Time Zones 

1 . Click and hold down the right mouse button in the center of the clock and a 
pull-down menu appears. Select World Map and the Time Zones display below will 
appear. 



Otitic 




wm^^^^^^^^^^^^^m 



Figure 4-12 (Clock - World Map/Time Zone) 

2. Specific times of areas of interest can be accessed three different ways. 

(1) Click and drag the mouse in the Roam Box which is located in the 
upper left hand comer. The Area it outlines will be seen as the large display and the Area 
time will be displayed. 

(2) Position the cursor on a square icon and the name of the specific area 
will appear and then click. An analog clock will appear with the local GMT alongside the 
user's GMT for his specific area. Click on Edit and select Make all Clocks Analog. The 
window will be displayed in the following example following the selection of Anchorage. 



'ii t nl 



Ik 












'^y 



<' 






Figure 4-13 (Area of Interest Time) 

(3) Click on the down arrow located on the bottom of the window and 
scroll to the desired area. The area time will be shown for each area as they are scrolled 
through. 



A4-9 



4.5.4 Close Clock 

Click on the file pull-down menu and select Close to close both the Clock window 
and the World Map window. 




4.6 



DOS (Disk Operating System) Tools provides the ability to format, export, import, and 
delete from 3.5 inch floppy disks. 



4.6.1 DOS Copy 

1 . Insert the floppy disk prior to running DOS Tools (it will look for the floppy 
disk upon start-up). 

2. Double click on the DOS Tools icon and the DOS Utility window, similar to 
the Storage and Retrieval window, will be launched. 



HardDijik 



Floppy 



ft t a-"" "■'•^ 


:3 














1 


^r^)r■. 
.t-vf.K. 




1^: — '-i: 




u 


— — -4-" 











r-m ^>^-V-n> n 



_ 

- U- -■* . 1/ 



Figure 4-14 (DOS Utility) 

3. The DOS Utilities window is broken into two parts. The Hard Disk to the right 
and the Floppy to the left. The left window, under each heading, gives a list of 
directories. The right window, under each heading, gives the lists of files within the 
directories. 

4. The center buttons allow for the coping of files to either window. The buttons 
(»Copy» and «Copy«) allow for the copying of one file in either direction (shown 



A4-10 



by the double arrows) to either the Hard Disk or the Floppy Disk. The buttons 
(»RCopy» and «RCopy«) allow for the copying of entire directories to either the 
Hard Disk or the Floppy Disk. 

5. At the bottom of the window is a status display window which shows what 
function the user is executing. 

6. Click on the Floppy pull-down and select Re-Read Floppy to see if the copied 
file(s) exist on the floppy disk. 



4.6.2 DOS Format 

1 . Under the heading Floppy, click and drag to Format Floppy to begin 
formatting. 

2. Format confirmation window below will appear, click Yes. 




Figure 4-15 (Format ConHrmation) 

3. The format status appears in the lower portion of the DOS Utility window 
stating, "Formatting Drive A." 

4. When the status disappears, formatting has been completed. 



4.6.3 DOS Export 

1 . Under the heading Hard Disk, click on the Disk pull-down menu. Select the 
directory where the exported file resides. Scroll through the file listing and double click 
to select the file to be exported. 

2. The center section of the window activates. Click on "»Copy»" to export to 
the floppy disk. 

3. While copying, a Copy Status window will appear, showing the status of the 
execution. Additionally, the status window will alert you that DOS Tools is performing 
the function. 



A4-11 



Cof^tflBS 



Figure 4-16 (Copying 1 Files) 



4. When exporting to the floppy disk is finished, the exported file will appear in 
the right hand window under the Floppy heading. 



4.6.4 DOS Import 

The system allows the user to import data from IBM compatible personal 
computers via DOS formatted floppy disks to selected directories. 

1 . Under the heading Hard Disk, click on the Disk pull-down menu and select the 
directory where the imported file will be placed. 

2. From the right side of the window, a listing of the contents of the floppy disk 
appears in the right column under the Floppy heading. Double click the file name to 
highlight the file to be imported. 

3. The center section of the window activates. Click on "«Copy«" to import. 

4. While copying, a Copy status window will appear, showing the status of the 
execution. Additionally, the status window will alert the user that DOS Tools is 
performing the function. 



Car^^ntjl fbss . 



Figure 4-17 (Copying 1 Files) 

5. When importing to Hard Disk is finished, the imported file will appear in the 
right hand window under the Hard Disk heading. 



4.6.5 DOS Rename 

1. To rename the exported file, click on the specific file you wish to rename. 

2. Click on Floppy pull-down and select Re-Name Selected. The Re-Name Item 
window below will appear. 



A4-12 



'fi-viifttit(tvtijitifti^ft4fi¥yf*f.it\M3^Ji^ 



Ro'-f»lam0 Item 



Enter new/ name: 



A r/SEIPl.PU} 



OK r cancel 



Help 



Figure 4-18 (Re-Name Item) 

3. Enter a new file name and click OK. 

4. The new file name will appear in the right hand window under the Floppy 
heading. 

4.6.6 DOS Erase 

1 . Click on the specific file to be deleted in the right hand window under the 
Floppy heading. 

2. Click on the Floppy pull-down menu and select Erase Selected. 

3. Confirmation window appears, click on Yes, and deletion will commence. 

4. When the file disappears from the right hand window under the Floppy 
heading, deletion has been executed. 

4.6.7 Eject Floppy Disk 

Click on the Floppy pull-down menu and select Eject. The floppy disk will eject 
after a short pause. 

4.6.8 Close DOS Tools 

Click on the File pull-down window and select close and the DOS Tools 
application will close. 



A4-13 




4.7 



1 . Double click on the Shutdown icon and this immediately shutdowns the system 
software down in a clean and safe manner. 

2. Network connectivity terminates when the following is seen: 

">b to boot, c to continue, n for new command" 



4.8 




Provides the ability to print a hard copy of the display to a local or remote printer. 



1 . Double click on the Print Screen icon and this will activate the function of 
capturing the user selected portion of the current screen. 

2. The cursor will change shape to a "90° angle bracket," click and drag the 
cursor over the area to be sent to the printer. 

3. When dragging the cursor, start in the upper left comer and drag diagonally to 
the opposite comer. While doing this you will see an outline of the specific area. 

4. Releasing the left mouse button will automatically send the specified area 
snapshot to the local or remote printer. 

5. The Print Utility window will appear in which to specify the printer output 
device desired. 



A4-14 



4.9 Project Manager 

The Project Manager is an optional JDISS package and not used by the new user. 



4.10 



System Load 



System Load is a tool for monitoring CPU (Central Processing Unit) usage. 
Double click on the System Load icon and the system load window below will appear. 





.--- ^:-:i>i<S5M^S$=:^& 


1- 


a 


\ 


mfr Ki> 














y. 

<: 


k L 






>) 


iLuli 







Figure 4-19 (System Load Graph) 







P 




w 


SaveJ 


:>creen 



4.11 



Save Screen provides the ability to save an image from your current display to a 
file in the user's home directory. 

1. Double click on the Save Screen icon and the system will open the window 
below which will prompt the user to enter a file name. 



A4-15 




Figure 4-20 (File Name Entry) 

2. Enter the file name with a .xwd ending, click on OK and the cursor will change 
to a 90° angle bracket. 

3. When the angle cursor appears, click and hold the left mouse button and drag 
over the specific area to be saved. When dragging the cursor, the user will see an outline 
of the area to be saved. 

4. Release the left mouse button and the user will hear a series of beeps telling 
him that the specific area has been saved. 

5. A bitmap of the specific area will be saved in the file name the user chose in 
the user's home directory. 

6. Access the home directory to verify the file was copied. 



4.12 




This utility tool enables the user to access files via the compact disk drive. 



1 . Double click on the CDROM icon and the CDROM desktop window below 
will appear. 



cpnaM o»»ktiip 



M:: H)il Vi;^^ Ojilhiiis _l_ni)l: 



Ht:ln 



i CCnOMMatint CC«OH eject 
3pt:^-f_--j.'cJf.Ui/(XI.'LX"Jktop^A.:-»Kf.Wxl C rtRPTl ' 

Figure 2-21 (CDROM Desktop) 

2. Double click on the CDROM Mount icon and a dialog window indicates if the 
CDROM is mounted successfully. 



A4-16 



3. Files are accessed, saved, copied, etc., by using the menu pull-downs similar to 
any word processing program. 

4. To remove the CDROM, double click on the CDROM Eject icon. 




4.13 



The Time Zone Clock provides a graphic look that shows the areas of the world 
currently in daylight and darkness. 

1. Double click on the Time Zone Clock icon and the below window will open. 




r- — i'^;yj;:i( <■► I -p-) :■) -€t jo Vj-.ys-.Lv lil isi s -et JO " — : 



Figure 4-22 (Sunclock) 

2. To close window, click on upper left comer "small bar" and click close. 




Video Pix is a hardware and software interface that accepts image inputs in a 
frame grab format in either PAL, NSTC, or S-video format signals. The input may be 
either black-and-white or color. Once the image is either loaded from file or frame 
grabbed (i.e. VCR player), the image may be saved to a specified directory in a variety of 
formats including ".tif." In order to grab a video frame, the Video Pix hardware must be 



A4-17 



installed. Video Pix is beyond the scope of the new user. Detailed instructions are 
provided in other operator guides. 




4.15 



Soft Windows is an optional JDISS package that provides a windows interface for 
personal computers running DOS. This package will be introduced in more advanced 
user guides. 




4.16 



E F 

Disk Status 



Disk Status details the amount of disk space used on the system. 
1 . Double click on the Disk Status icon and the Disk Usage interface window 
below will appear. 



DJAStatm JT^mifaco | ■ ] — I 



MBk« 







2tC.CC^HD:■ Total' 






Figure 4-23 (Disk Stats Interface) 

2. The window provides the user with a graphical illustration of the disk status 
plus an actual statistical estimate of how much of the disk is being used and how much is 
left. The Free, Critical and Used space is color coded to provide status at a glance. 



3. To Close Disk Status, click on the upper left comer "small bar" and click 



Close. 



A4-18 



4.17 




1 . Double click on the Set Password icon and the User Password window below 
will open. 



QiceteJag password for thetBar on jita^i-bri 
;i.OWPass\TOrd; 



Usttr Pasiv/nrd. 



Cuncti 



he^ 




New Password 



Enter New FSsswomt 



OK 



canca 



Heit) 




Figure 4-24 (User Password) 

2. Enter the old password and click OK. 

3. Enter the new password and click OK. 

4. Enter the new password again to verify and the system will now update the 
user's password to the new password. The application will close automatically. 




The Version icon displays the application versions currently loaded to the JDISS 
workstation. Select OK and the window will close. 



A4-19 



JI>ISS Sojbtftafe Versiom 






Mirl-_lL.'i:aaTi£bGt; iviri^ica; C.Oj : - i til } ->:.diKEt; 

CTm'; Emb^ddid •jirp.f.rir: 2.0 ran 

<-'iH- i.j:<ili=itlj^, am -.;•>>. 11.1 i Ti-riKHti; FT.T 

vi>J*c- Viz ..0 aux 






J.I 

•'. < 
3.5 

J. "'3 

i.lS- 
;:. 1 
I . s. 



L. 



Figure 4-24 (JDISS Software Versions) 



4.19 Conclusion 



Not all the functionality of each utility tool is addressed. However, the critical 
fundamental items for the new user were provided to guide him through the basic 
requirements needed to learn and operate a JDISS workstation. The Utilities applications 
in JDISS are an integral tool for the user. Especially useful are the maintenance, storage, 
transfer and backup of files. JDISS has streamlined these executions for the users who do 
not have UNIX backgrounds so that they too can perform these critical functions with 
ease. 



A4-20 



APPENDIX B: JOINT DEPLOY ABLE INTELLIGENCE SUPPORT SYSTEM 
(JDISS) WORKSTATIONS REQUIREMENTS AND PERIPHERALS 

The purpose of Appendix B is to provide the user with an overview of the 
hardware requirements that may be used as a host for the JDISS Apphcations. 



25 



APPENDIX B 
TABLE OF CONTENTS 



1 JDISS WORKSTATION REQUIREMENTS B 1 - 1 

1 . 1 Minimum Stand- Alone Requirements B 1 - 1 

1.2 Minimum Client-Server Requirements Bl-2 

2 WORKSTATIONS AND PERIPHERALS B2-1 

2.1 Fixed Workstations B2-1 

2.2 Portable Workstations B2-1 

2.3 Printers B2-1 

2.4 Scanners B2-2 

2.5 Digital Camera B2-2 



B-i 



APPENDIX B 

SECTION 1 

JDISS WORKSTATIONS REQUIREMENTS 



JDISS version 2.0 can operate within the UNIX environment on a wide selection of 
workstations. The following are the minimum workstation requirements. 

1.1 Minimum Stand-Alone Requirements 

To load JDISS version 2.0 with full applications requires a high-performance 
UNIX-based workstation with the following minimum requirements: 

1. Central Processing Unit 

(1) 40 MHz 

(2) 28.5 MIPS (MilHon Instructions per Second) 

(3) Micro SPARC II Processor 

(4) TurboGX 8-bit Accelerated Color Graphics Workstation 

(5) TurboGX 1 MB frame buffer 

(6) 1 6 MB RAM (32 MB for best performance) 

(7) 1.44 MB 3.5" Internal Floppy Drive 

(8) 3 S-Bus Slots 

(9) Dual Serial Ports 

(10) 8-bit Audio Internal Speaker 

2. CD-ROM (optional) 

3. Hard Drive (Without Corporate Services Application, i.e., other local 
programs) 

(1) 1 .341 GB - With JDISS Embedded Support (JES - interactive help 
tutorial) 

(2) 1.201 GB- Without JES 

4. Laser Postscript Compatible Printer 

5. Scanner (optional) 



Bl-1 



1.2 Minimum Client-Server Requirements 

The requirements for Client-Server are similar to minimum stand-alone requirements in 
section 1 . 1 with the following additional minimum requirement exceptions. 

1. Hard Drive 

(1) Client 

a. 557 MB (No JES or Corporate Services Applications) 

(2) Server (Without Corporate Services) 

b. 1.341GB -With JES 

c. 1.201 GB - Without JES 

2. 4mm, 8mm or 1/4" Tape Drive (Server) 



Bl-2 



APPENDIX B 

SECTION 2 

WORKSTATIONS AND PERIPHERALS 



JDISS can currently operate within the UNIX environment on a wide selection of 
workstations and connect to a variety of peripherals. The list continues to grow each day. 
The following are associated equipment items common today. 



2.1 Fixed Workstations 

1. JDISS Single Processors and operating software require 

a. Sun SPARC station 2 (Solaris 1. 1 .2/1 . 1 . 1 Rev B) 

b. Sun SPARC station 5 Model 70 (Solaris 1 . 1 .2/1 . 1 . 1 Rev B) 

2. JDISS Multi Processor and operating software require 

a. Sun SPARC station 10 Model 30 (Solaris 1.1.2/1.1.1 RevB) 

b. Sun SPARC station 20 Model 50 (Solaris 1 . 1 .2/1 . 1. 1 Rev B) 



2.2 Portable Workstations 

1. SAIT(SunOS4.1.3 w/JDISSvl.Ol) 

2. CODAR Explorer (recommended) (Solaris 1 . 1 .2/1 . 1 . 1 Rev B) 

3. RDI Poweriite (recommended) (Solaris 1.1.2/1.1.1 Rev B) 



2.3 Printers 

JDISS can print to any postscript level 2 compatible printer. ALL third party 
printers supporting postscript level 2 and using Sun parallel cable or Newsprint card can 
print fi^om JDISS applications. It should be noted that the printing of images or graphics 
from applications could result in postscript files being created which may be up to four 
times the normal size. This encapsulation of the image into a postscript format not only 
consumes lots of memory but is also time consuming. This list is dated as of April 1996. 

1. General Purpose Postscript 

a. LEXMARK Optra R Series High Resolution Laser Printer (1200 
DPI @ 8ppm or 600 DPI @ 12ppm) 

b. Sun SPARC printer II (600 DPI @ 12ppm) 

c. Sun SPARC printer (300 DPI @ 12ppm) 

d. Sun Newsprinter 20 



B2-1 



2.5ppni) 



High Resolution Color Postscript 

a. Tektronix Phaser 540 Color Laser Printer (600 DPI @ 3.5ppm) 

b. Tektronix Phaser 440 Small Format Color Printer (300 DPI @ 

c. HP LaserJet 4 (600 DPI) 



3. Medium Resolution Color Postscript 

a. Tektronix Phaser II SDX Mid-Resolution Color Printer (300 
DPI@4.1ppm) 

b. Tektronix Phaser III PXi Color Printer (300 DPI) 

4. High Resolution Imagery Printers 

a. XL7700-CS SCSI Interface Printer 

b. XL7720-CS SCSI Interface Printer 

c. XL7720-CI IEEE 488 Interface Printer 

d. XL8600 

e. Tektronix Phaser 480 Color Printer 

5. Printers/Scanner/Copiers 

a. Cannon CJ-10 Color Printer/Scanner/Copier (400 DPI) 



2.4 Scanners 



1. Microtek ScanMaker IIXE Flatbed Scanner (600 x 600 DPI, 8.5" x 13.5") 

2. Sharp JX-6 1 Flatbed Scanner ( 1 200 x 1 200 DPI, 11 " x 1 7") 



2.5 Digital Camera 

1 . DCS 200 Kodak Digital Camera with SCSI Interface 

2. DCS 420 Kodak Digital Camera with SCSI and PCMCIA removable Hard 
Drive 

3. DCS 460 and DCS 465 are "NOT SUPPORTED" 



B2-2 



LIST OF REFERENCES 



Alves, Chris J02, "JDISS: When You Need It Now!" All Hands, Unclassified, August 
1996. 

Computer System Reference Manual (CSRM) for the JDISS v2.0, BTG, Inc., 
Unclassified, May 1995. 

Defense Information Infrastructure - Based JDISS (DII-JDISS), ONI-71 Demonstration 
Plan for JWID 97, Unclassified, February 1997. 

ELT-2 User Guide, Applix, Inc., Unclassified, copyright 1990-1992. 

JDISS Application Version 2.0, http//164. 117. 208. 50/abstracts/jdiss. html, Unclassified 
(SIPRNET), May 1995. 

JDISS Basic Operator Course (JBOC) v2. Student Guide, Joint Intelligence Training 
Activity, Pacific (JITAP), Unclassified, April 1996. 

JDISS Program Management Office (PMO), 0NI-71D, DSN 294-5072, Commercial 
(301) 669-5072. 

Joint Intelligence Center (JIC), JDISS Brief, Unclassified, September 1995. 

Myers, Russell E., "Challenges to the Defense Intelligence Information System 
PTofessiomd,'' American Intelligence Journal, Unclassified, August 1994. 

Quick Reference Guide (ORG) for the Joint Deployable Intelligence Support System v2.0, 
BTG, Inc., Unclassified, May 1995. 

77?^ Joint Deployable Intelligence Support System, 

http//164. 199.250. U/jdiss/cmdocs/ord/ ordl.html, Unclassified (SIPRNET), April 1994. 



27 



28 



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No. of copies 



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Naval Postgraduate School 

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MCCDC, Code C46 

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MCCDC, Code C40RC 

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MCCDC, Code C45 

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6. Joint Intelligence Training Activity, Pacific (JIT AP) 2 

Attn: LT Frank Nolan, JBOC Course Coordinator 

33470 Puerto Rico Street 

San Diego, California 92133-1847 

7. Navy and Marine Corps Intelligence Training Center (NMITC) 2 

Attn: LCDR Bill Ulman, N20 

2088 Regulus Avenue 

Virginia Beach, Virginia 23461-2099 

8. Professor Dan C. Boger, Code CC 1 

Naval Postgraduate School 

Monterey, California 93943 



29 



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Naval Postgraduate School 
Monterey, California 93943 



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Naval Postgraduate School 
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Attn: Maj J. C. Cummiskey 

Box 555171 

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